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Robert M. Bond
Ohio State University
PsychologySocial mediaSocial psychologySocial networkPolitics
21Publications
7H-index
1,249Citations
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Publications 23
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#1Robert M. Bond (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
Abstract This research investigates the screen-based media consumption of adolescents in their social context, using social contagion theory to understand how screen-based media consumption is affected by an individual’s social environment. To assess the possibility of person-to-person spread and the social network determinants of screen-based media consumption behavior, analyses were performed on the social networks of adolescents. First, the social networks of adolescents were assessed for the...
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#1Robert M. Bond (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
Theoretical models and experiments suggest that social networks may significantly impact the emergence and stability of cooperation in humans. Similarly, theoretical models and experiments have shown that punishing behavior can significantly increase cooperative behavior in individuals. However, how punishing impacts the effects of social networks on cooperation is not yet understood. Here, I examine a set of laboratory experiments in which participants choose to cooperate or defect under differ...
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#1Megan A. Vendemia (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 4
#2Robert M. Bond (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
Last. David C. DeAndrea (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 13
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Abstract This online experiment examines how partisan cues interact with features of newer media to affect how people evaluate political messages online. Specifically, we examine the degree to which obscuring the political affiliations of different online sources can influence how viewers evaluate the political messages they share through social media. We also examine how viewers evaluate political organizations that appear to strategically suppress comments that accompany their political posts....
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#1Robert M. Bond (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
#2Matthew D. Sweitzer (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 2
As communication increasingly occurs in online environments, it is important to know the structure of such conversations in social networks. Here, we investigate patterns of conversation in online ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Robert M. Bond (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
#2Hillary C. Shulman (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 8
Last. Michael Gilbert (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 2
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This experiment ( N = 238) tested propositions from social identity theory alongside the intergroup contact hypothesis to examine whether having a political discussion with an in-group (politically similar) or out-group (politically different) member affects subsequent evaluations of these social groups. Although several experimental results provide strong support for the antisocial predictions proposed by social identity theory, ultimately it was found that having a political discussion with an...
#1Robert M. Bond (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
AbstractMembers of the same household share similar social attitudes, but the source of the similarity in attitudes may be attributed to many processes. This study uses data from a randomized field experiment to identify contagion in attitude change about anti-transgender prejudice. During a face-to-face canvassing experiment, registered voters who answered the door were exposed to either a message encouraging active perspective taking intended to reduce transphobia or a recycling message. Here,...
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#1Robert M. Bond (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
#2Christopher J. Fariss (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 1
Last. E SettleJaime (W&M: College of William & Mary)H-Index: 10
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Our main goal in this chapter is to summarize and describe our work on get-out-the-vote experiments run on the Facebook social media platform. We ran randomized experiments and observed both direct effects—a message on Election Day made Facebook users more likely to vote and cascading effects in the social network—the friends of treated users became more likely to vote. Collaborating with Facebook vastly increased the scope of our research project from what we originally planned. We will also di...
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#1Robert M. Bond (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
#2Volha Chykina (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 3
Last. Jason J. Jones (SUNY: State University of New York System)H-Index: 8
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Abstract How peer groups contribute to educational outcomes has long interested researchers. However, the possibility that peer groups dominated by either low- or high-achieving youth can have substantively different effects on achievement has been largely ignored. In this paper, we show that while being embedded in a high-achieving network of friends is not associated with increased own achievement, being embedded in a low-achieving network is associated with decreased own achievement. In addit...
4 CitationsSource
#1Jason J. Jones (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 8
#2Robert M. Bond (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
Last. H FowlerJames (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 59
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A large-scale experiment during the 2010 U.S. Congressional Election demonstrated a positive effect of an online get-out-the-vote message on real world voting behavior. Here, we report results from a replication of the experiment conducted during the U.S. Presidential Election in 2012. In spite of the fact that get-out-the-vote messages typically yield smaller effects during high-stakes elections due to saturation of mobilization efforts from many sources, a significant increase in voting was ag...
25 CitationsSource
#1Robert M. Bond (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
Research now shows that human social networks surrounding a person who unexpectedly dies recover from the loss through strengthening of the relationships between friends and acquaintances of the deceased individual. The study demonstrates how individuals change their interaction patterns to support one another during a time of grief.
3 CitationsSource
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