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Paula J. Stotz
Queen's University
14Publications
5H-index
158Citations
Publications 14
Newest
ABSTRACTPurposeThis study aimed to determine the magnitude of exercise-induced individual variability for waist circumference (WC) and body weight change after accounting for biological variability and measurement error. Determinants of response variability were also considered.MethodsParticipants (
2 CitationsSource
#1Theresa E. Cowan (Queen's University)H-Index: 1
#2Andrea M. Brennan (Queen's University)H-Index: 3
Last.Robert Ross (Queen's University)H-Index: 51
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#1Louise de Lannoy (Queen's University)H-Index: 7
#2John Clarke (Queen's University)H-Index: 4
Last.Robert Ross (Queen's University)H-Index: 51
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Aim To determine the separate effects of exercise amount and intensity on the rate of response for glucose and insulin variables, where rate of response was defined as the number of individuals with improvement in glucose and insulin values that was beyond the day-to-day variability of measurement. Methods Participants were 171 sedentary, middle-aged abdominally obese adults who completed a 24-week intervention. Participants were randomly assigned to (1) no-exercise control (n = 51), (2) low-amo...
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#1William Bostad (Queen's University)
#2Thomas Alexander Ricketts (Queen's University)
Last.Robert Ross (Queen's University)H-Index: 51
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The present study was designed to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease as determined by cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in a large sample of inactive, obese adults. Cardiovascular disease risk was determined using published age- and sex-adjusted values for low, moderate, and high CRF from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (ACLS). Contrary to expectations, ACLS-CRF classifications identified approximately 60% of our inactive, obese adults as having moderate or high CRF and hence, low ca...
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