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Gavin Sandercock
University of Essex
Cardiorespiratory fitnessPhysical therapyDiabetes mellitusHeart rate variabilityMedicine
130Publications
28H-index
2,699Citations
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Publications 142
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#1Alan M. NevillH-Index: 56
#2Michael J. DuncanH-Index: 26
Last. Gavin Sandercock (University of Essex)H-Index: 28
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Previous research into the association between aerobic fitness and physical activity in children is equivocal. However, previous research has always assumed that such an association was linear. Thi...
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#1Chris J. McManus (University of Essex)H-Index: 1
#2Prabhuraj D. Venkatraman (MMU: Manchester Metropolitan University)H-Index: 1
Last. Gavin Sandercock (University of Essex)H-Index: 28
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Abstract The interface pressure applied by compression clothing is an important measure in evaluating the efficacy of the bio-physical impact of compression. The aim was to compare two portable pneumatic pressure measuring devices (PicoPress and Kikuhime), against a non-portable, Hohenstein System (HOSY) reference standard, used by medical regulatory agencies. Interface pressure obtained in-vivo (calf) by the PicoPress and Kikuhime, were compared with HOSY. The mean bias and limits of agreement ...
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#1Ulric S. Abonie (University of Essex)H-Index: 1
#2Gavin Sandercock (University of Essex)H-Index: 28
Last. Florentina J. Hettinga (University of Essex)H-Index: 3
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AbstractA meta-analysis was conducted to (1) determine the effect of activity pacing interventions on fatigue, physical functioning and physical activity among patients with chronic conditions asso...
4 CitationsSource
Studies have tested pressure training (PT) interventions in which performers practice physical or technical skills under simulated psychological pressure, but research has not yet synthesized the results of these studies. This meta-analysis assessed the magnitude of PT’s effect on performance in sport and other high-pressure domains (e.g., law enforcement). A secondary purpose was to investigate how domain, dose, experience, and the type of task moderated the effectiveness of interventions. A st...
1 CitationsSource
#1Alan M. Nevill (University of Wolverhampton)H-Index: 56
#2Michael J. Duncan (Coventry University)H-Index: 26
Last. Gavin Sandercock (University of Essex)H-Index: 28
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Abstract Background This study sought to explore the dose–response rate/association between aerobic fitness (VO2max) and self-reported physical activity (PA) and to assess whether this association varies by sex, age and weight status. Methods VO2max was assessed using the 20-m shuttle-run test. PA was assessed using the Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ) for Adolescents (aged >11 years, PAQ-A) or for Children (aged ≤11 years, PAQ-C). The associations between VO2max and PAQ were analyzed using...
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The positive contribution of physical education (PE) to daily physical activity (PA) has been documented in past studies. However, little is known about the contribution of PE to inactive and unfit schoolchildren’s PA. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine the contribution of PE to the daily PA of schoolchildren, especially for inactive and unfit schoolchildren. Accelerometers were used to measure the PA of 111 boys (Mage = 13.6 ± 0.8 years) across 7 days. Moderate-to-vigoro...
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#1Gavin Sandercock (University of Essex)H-Index: 28
#2Ben Jones (University of Essex)H-Index: 13
Tomkinson et al 1 report temporal trends in aerobic fitness of 1 142 026 children aged 7–19 years old using estimates from the 20 m shuttle run. The data show continued declines in fitness described as ‘ indicative of declines in population health ’. The authors propose that surveillance of children’s fitness should be undertaken within ‘ harmonised national health surveys ’. The authors’ convictions in the potential value of extending paediatric health surveillance to include fitness measures w...
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#1Alan M. Nevill (University of Wolverhampton)H-Index: 56
#2Michael J. DuncanH-Index: 26
Last. Gavin Sandercock (University of Essex)H-Index: 28
view all 3 authors...
#2Alan M. NevillH-Index: 56
Last. Gavin SandercockH-Index: 28
view all 3 authors...
Comparisons of physical fitness measures between children or within group measures over time are potentially confounded by differences in body size. We compared measures of strength (handgrip) and aerobic fitness (running-speed [20m shuttle-run]) of 10.0–15.9 year-olds from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania (n = 977) with schoolchildren from England (n = 1014) matched for age and sex. Differences in fitness were analyzed using general linear models, with allometric scaling for body size (mass and stature)...
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