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Stephanie J. Tobin
Australian Catholic University
46Publications
9H-index
271Citations
Publications 46
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#1Stephanie J. Tobin (ACU: Australian Catholic University)H-Index: 9
#2Sarah McDermott (UQ: University of Queensland)
Last.Luke French (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
Three experiments examined the effects of group size on reactions to ostracism and inclusion. Participants engaged in an online introduction activity with 2 or 6 other people and received likes from everyone (inclusion) or no one (ostracism). In Studies 1 and 2, group size had a significant effect on need satisfaction only when participants were ostracized, with larger groups threatening needs to a greater extent. These effects were evident during and immediately after the task, but not after a ...
#1Eric J. Vanman (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 17
#2Rosemary Baker (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 6
Last.Stephanie J. Tobin (ACU: Australian Catholic University)H-Index: 9
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People occasionally choose to cut themselves off from their online social network by taking extended breaks from Facebook. This study investigated whether abstaining from Facebook reduces stress but also reduces subjective well-being because of the resulting social disconnection. Participants (138 active Facebook users) were assigned to either a condition in which they were instructed to give up Facebook for 5 days or continue to use Facebook as normal. Perceived stress and well-being, as well a...
#1Ralph M. BarnesH-Index: 3
Last.Chelsea M. TaglangH-Index: 3
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Media coverage attacking the character and trustworthiness of a scientist can diminish public faith in the research findings of that scientist. Ralph M. Barnes, Heather M. Johnston, Noah MacKenzie, Stephanie J. Tobin and Chelsea M. Taglang have investigated the degree to which such attacks do undermine trust in that scientist's research, and the relative impact of various types of ad hominem attacks. Perhaps surprisingly, purely ad hominem attacks, such as accusations of a financial conflict of ...
#1Ralph M. Barnes (MSU: Montana State University)H-Index: 3
#2Ralph M. Barnes (MSU: Montana State University)
Last.Chelsea M. Taglang (Hood College)H-Index: 3
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Two experiments were conducted to determine the relative impact of direct and indirect (ad hominem) attacks on science claims. Four hundred and thirty-nine college students (Experiment 1) and 199 adults (Experiment 2) read a series of science claims and indicated their attitudes towards those claims. Each claim was paired with one of the following: A) a direct attack upon the empirical basis of the science claim B) an ad hominem attack on the scientist who made the claim or C) both. Results indi...
#1Ralph M. Barnes (MSU: Montana State University)H-Index: 3
#2Stephanie J. Tobin (ACU: Australian Catholic University)H-Index: 9
Last.Chelsea M. Taglang (Hood College)H-Index: 3
view all 5 authors...
A series of five experiments examined how the evaluation of a scientific finding was influenced by information about the number of studies that had successfully replicated the initial finding. The experiments also tested the impact of frame (negative, positive) and numeric format (percentage, natural frequency) on the evaluation of scientific findings. In Experiments 1 through 4, an attitude difference score served as the dependent measure, while a measure of choice served as the dependent measu...
We examined whether sharing photographs of known others on Instagram was associated with greater satisfaction and happiness. We asked 113 Instagram users to describe a number of the photographs they had shared on Instagram: 1 that made them feel happy and the 5 they had shared most recently (excluding the nominated happy photograph). For each photograph, participants indicated its content and rated how much satisfaction they obtained from looking at it and sharing it. Participants also completed...
#1Stephanie J. Tobin (ACU: Australian Catholic University)H-Index: 9
#2Katharine H. Greenaway (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 15
Last.Marie E. Crittall (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 1
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We examined the role of reward sensitivity and the motivation to balance ‘have-to’ and ‘want-to’ goals in vicarious goal satiation. In Experiment 1, participants who read about a target who completed an academic goal performed worse on an academic (‘have-to’) task and were more interested in engaging in inherently rewarding (‘want-to’) activities than participants who read about an incomplete goal. In Experiment 2, after reading about a target who completed a ‘have-to’ goal, participants who wer...
#1Stephanie J. Tobin (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 9
#2Eric J. Vanman (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 17
Last.Alexander K. Saeri (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 5
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We examined two threats to belonging and related needs on Facebook: lurking (Study 1) and ostracism (Study 2). In Study 1, participants were either allowed or not allowed to share information on Facebook for 48 hours. Those who were not allowed to share information had lower levels of belonging and meaningful existence. In Study 2, participants engaged in a laboratory-based Facebook activity. Half of the profiles were set up so that participants would not receive any feedback on their status upd...
#1Stephanie J. TobinH-Index: 9
#2Melanie P. GeorgeH-Index: 1
Secondary control (acceptance of and adjustment to negative events) is thought to promote positive affect. We examined the opposite path: could positive affect increase secondary control, particularly among individuals high in causal uncertainty, who stand to benefit from it the most? In two studies, participants completed a causal uncertainty scale, thought about a problem while listening to affect-inducing music or no music, and then completed items that assessed secondary control. In Study 1,...
#1D. Matthew T. Clark (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 3
#2Natalie J. Loxton (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 19
Last.Stephanie J. Tobin (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 9
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We examined changes in loneliness over time. Study 1 was a cross-temporal meta-analysis of 48 samples of American college students who completed the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale (total N = 13,041). In Study 1, loneliness declined from 1978 to 2009 (d = −0.26). Study 2 used a representative sample of high school students from the Monitoring the Future project (total N = 385,153). In Study 2, loneliness declined from 1991 to 2012. Declines were similar among White students (d = −0.14), Black stud...
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