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Annebel H. B. De Hoogh
University of Amsterdam
35Publications
18H-index
2,185Citations
Publications 35
Newest
#1Jesse T. Vullinghs (VU: VU University Amsterdam)
#2Annebel H. B. De Hoogh (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 18
Last.Corine Boon (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 12
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Burnout has important ramifications for employees and organizations and preventing burnout forms an ethical issue for managers. However, the role of the leader and especially the role of ethical aspects of leadership have received relatively little attention in relation to burnout to date. We conducted a survey among employees (N = 386) of a Dutch retail organization, nested in 122 teams with a leader. Our first contribution is that we empirically show the hypothesized opposing relationships of ...
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#2Lindred L. GreerH-Index: 22
Last.Niro SivanathanH-Index: 17
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Interest in the role of hierarchy in groups and organizations is on the rise. A number of influential theoretical and empirical papers have been published in recent years investigating how, when, a...
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#1Deanne N. Den Hartog (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 45
#2Annebel H. B. De Hoogh (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 18
Last.Frank D. Belschak (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 17
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Self-promotion is a form of impression management aiming to present to others a positive image of oneself by emphasizing one’s strengths, contributions, or accomplishments. In the workplace, self-promotion is often targeted at leaders, with employees trying to show a positive image and impress their leader. Self-promotion does not always impress observers though, and we propose that leaders high on narcissism are more likely to be impressed by employee self-promotion than those low on narcissism...
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#1Barbara Nevicka (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 4
#2Annebel H. B. De Hoogh (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 18
Last.Frank D. Belschak (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 17
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Narcissistic leaders are self-absorbed and hold beliefs of entitlement and superiority. Their aggressive tendencies in the face of criticism and inclinations to validate their self-worth by derogating others may lead others to perceive them as being abusive. Here, we test the relationship between leader narcissism and followers' perceptions of abusive supervision. Drawing upon research related to the behavioral plasticity hypothesis, we propose that followers with low self-esteem will perceive n...
4 CitationsSource
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#1Christian J. Resick (Drexel University)H-Index: 20
#2Blythe L Rosikiewicz (Drexel University)
Last.Jonathan C. Ziegert (Drexel University)H-Index: 12
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Research on the study of leader traits suggests that dark-side traits can derail a leader’s success or help a leader flourish depending on the context of the situation. While previous literature sh...
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#1Annebel H. B. De Hoogh (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 18
#2Lindred L. Greer (Stanford University)H-Index: 22
Last.Deanne N. Den Hartog (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 45
view all 3 authors...
Autocratic leader behavior is often seen as negative for team morale and performance. However, theories on social hierarchy suggest that autocratic leadership may also positively affect morale and performance through the creation of a psychologically appealing, hierarchically-ordered environment of predictability and security. We propose that autocratic leadership can foster team psychological safety when team members accept the hierarchy within the team. In contrast, when members challenge the ...
27 CitationsSource
#1Annebel H. B. De Hoogh (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 18
#2Deanne N. Den Hartog (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 45
Last.Barbora Nevicka (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
Researchers have obtained inconsistent results on the relationship between leader narcissism and leader effectiveness evaluations. Here we draw on social role theory and recent findings on prescriptive gender stereotypes to propose that leader's and follower's gender influence the degree to which narcissistic leaders are perceived as effective. Narcissistic female leaders lack stereotypically gender appropriate qualities (e.g. kindness) and demonstrate undesirable qualities associated with the o...
18 CitationsSource
#1Barbora Nevicka (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 5
#2Annebel H. B. De Hoogh (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 18
Last.Femke S. Ten Velden (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 11
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Narcissistic leaders present us with an interesting paradox, because they have positive as well as negative characteristics. As such, we argue that the nature of the context determines how suitable narcissists are perceived to be as leaders. Here we propose that a specific contextual factor, that is, uncertainty, increases the preference for narcissists as leaders. As an initial test of this prediction, the first study showed that narcissistic characteristics were evaluated as more desirable in ...
24 CitationsSource
#1Karianne Kalshoven (UU: Utrecht University)H-Index: 9
#2Deanne N. Den Hartog (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 45
Last.Annebel H. B. De Hoogh (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 18
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In this multisource study, we investigated a mediated moderation model proposing the moderating role of job autonomy and the mediating role of responsibility in the relationship of ethical leadership (subordinate rated) with helping and initiative (supervisor rated). In line with expectations, a study among 147 leader–follower dyads demonstrated that perceived job autonomy moderated the relationship of ethical leadership with both helping and initiative such that this relationship was positive w...
25 CitationsSource
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