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Kevin de Queiroz
National Museum of Natural History
113Publications
38H-index
8,750Citations
Publications 113
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2018in The American Naturalist3.85
Steven Poe15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Adrián Nieto-Montes de Oca16
Estimated H-index: 16
+ 8 AuthorsFernando Ayala-Varela4
Estimated H-index: 4
AbstractAdaptive radiation is a widely recognized pattern of evolution wherein substantial phenotypic change accompanies rapid speciation. Adaptive radiation may be triggered by environmental opportunities resulting from dispersal to new areas or via the evolution of traits, called key innovations, that allow for invasion of new niches. Species sampling is a known source of bias in many comparative analyses, yet classic adaptive radiations have not been studied comparatively with comprehensively...
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Systematic Biology10.27
Steven Poe15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UNM: University of New Mexico),
Adrián Nieto-Montes de Oca16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UNAM: National Autonomous University of Mexico)
+ 8 AuthorsFernando Ayala-Varela4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador)
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Current Biology9.19
Tyler R. Lyson4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of the Witwatersrand),
Bruce S. Rubidge28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of the Witwatersrand)
+ 5 AuthorsGaberiel Bever1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NYIT: New York Institute of Technology)
Summary The turtle shell is a complex structure that currently serves a largely protective function in this iconically slow-moving group [1]. Developmental [2, 3] and fossil [4–7] data indicate that one of the first steps toward the shelled body plan was broadening of the ribs (approximately 50 my before the completed shell [5]). Broadened ribs alone provide little protection [8] and confer significant locomotory [9, 10] and respiratory [9, 11] costs. They increase thoracic rigidity [8], which d...
Published on Jan 1, 2016
Larry J. Buckley1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Kevin de Queiroz38
Estimated H-index: 38
+ 4 AuthorsCatherine L. Stephen
Emma Sherratt13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UNE: University of New England (Australia)),
María del Rosario Castañeda6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Harvard University)
+ 5 AuthorsJonathan B. Losos75
Estimated H-index: 75
(Harvard University)
Abstract Whether the structure of ecological communities can exhibit stability over macroevolutionary timescales has long been debated. The similarity of independently evolved Anolis lizard communities on environmentally similar Greater Antillean islands supports the notion that community evolution is deterministic. However, a dearth of Caribbean Anolis fossils—only three have been described to date—has precluded direct investigation of the stability of anole communities through time. Here we re...
Published on Apr 6, 2015in ZooKeys1.14
Omar Torres-Carvajal14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Pablo J. Venegas9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Kevin de Queiroz38
Estimated H-index: 38
The discovery of three new species of Enyalioides from the tropical Andes in Ecuador and northern Peru is reported. Enyalioides altotambo sp. n. occurs in northwestern Ecuador and differs from other species of Enyalioides in having dorsal scales that are both smooth and homogeneous in size, a brown iris, and in lacking enlarged, circular and keeled scales on the flanks. Enyalioides anisolepis sp. n. occurs on the Amazonian slopes of the Andes in southern Ecuador and northern Peru and can be dist...
Published on Dec 1, 2014in Nature Communications11.88
Tyler R. Lyson4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Smithsonian Institution),
Emma R. Schachner13
Estimated H-index: 13
(LSU: Louisiana State University)
+ 5 AuthorsKevin de Queiroz38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Smithsonian Institution)
The origin of the unique turtle lung ventilatory apparatus is poorly understood. Here the authors show an increase in body wall rigidity early in evolution that allowed the abdominal muscles to become specialized for breathing and the ribs to eventually form the iconic turtle shell.
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