Match!
Stephen M. Lawrie
University of Edinburgh
428Publications
55H-index
9,150Citations
Publications 428
Newest
#2Mandy Johnstone (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 10
Last.Siddharthan ChandranH-Index: 47
view all 24 authors...
Although the underlying neurobiology of major mental illness (MMI) remains unknown, emerging evidence implicates a role for oligodendrocyte–myelin abnormalities. Here, we took advantage of a large family carrying a balanced t(1;11) translocation, which substantially increases risk of MMI, to undertake both diffusion tensor imaging and cellular studies to evaluate the consequences of the t(1;11) translocation on white matter structural integrity and oligodendrocyte–myelin biology. This translocat...
#2Hieab H.H. Adams (EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)H-Index: 19
Last.M. Arfan Ikram (EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)H-Index: 82
view all 289 authors...
Subcortical brain structures are integral to motion, consciousness, emotions and learning. We identified common genetic variation related to the volumes of the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, brainstem, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen and thalamus, using genome-wide association analyses in almost 40,000 individuals from CHARGE, ENIGMA and UK Biobank. We show that variability in subcortical volumes is heritable, and identify 48 significantly associated loci (40 novel at the time of analysi...
#1Sonja M.C. de Zwarte (UU: Utrecht University)H-Index: 5
#2Rachel M. Brouwer (UU: Utrecht University)H-Index: 32
Last.Neeltje E. M. van Haren (UU: Utrecht University)H-Index: 3
view all 91 authors...
Background Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share genetic liability and some structural brain abnormalities are common to both conditions. First-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients (FDRs-SZ) show similar brain abnormalities to patients, albeit with smaller effect sizes. Imaging findings in bipolar disorder first-degree relatives (FDRs-BD) have been inconsistent in the past, but recent studies report regionally greater volumes compared to controls. Methods Here, we meta-analyzed global a...
#1Emma Neilson (Royal Edinburgh Hospital)H-Index: 6
#2Xueyi Shen (Royal Edinburgh Hospital)H-Index: 2
Last.Stephen M. Lawrie (Royal Edinburgh Hospital)H-Index: 55
view all 14 authors...
Abstract Background Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder with many genetic variants of individually small effect contributing to phenotypic variation. Lower cortical thickness (CT), surface area, and cortical volume have been demonstrated in people with schizophrenia. Furthermore, a range of obstetric complications (e.g., lower birth weight) are consistently associated with an increased risk for schizophrenia. We investigated whether a high polygenic risk score for schizophrenia (PGRS-...
#1Pauline Favre (French Institute of Health and Medical Research)H-Index: 2
#2Melissa Pauling (French Institute of Health and Medical Research)
Last.Josselin HouenouH-Index: 22
view all 59 authors...
Fronto-limbic white matter (WM) abnormalities are assumed to lie at the heart of the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD); however, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have reported heterogeneous results and it is not clear how the clinical heterogeneity is related to the observed differences. This study aimed to identify WM abnormalities that differentiate patients with BD from healthy controls (HC) in the largest DTI dataset of patients with BD to date, collected via the ENIGMA network....
#1Clara Alloza (Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón)H-Index: 7
#2Manuel Blesa-Cabez (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 1
Last.Stephen M. Lawrie (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 55
view all 14 authors...
Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with considerable phenotypic heterogeneity. Hallmark psychotic symptoms can be considered as existing on a continuum from non-clinical to clinical populations. Assessing genetic risk and psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) in non-clinical populations and their associated neurobiological underpinnings can offer valuable insights into symptom-associated brain mechanisms without the potential confounds of the effects of schizophrenia and its treatment. We ...
#1Bill Deakin (University of Manchester)H-Index: 15
#2John Suckling (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 80
Last.Drake Rj Smallman R Barnes Nm (RMIT: RMIT University)
view all 17 authors...
12345678910