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James Battin
Northern Arizona University
7Publications
4H-index
1,633Citations
Publications 7
Newest
Published on Aug 1, 2011in The Condor 2.72
James Battin4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Northern Arizona University),
Thomas D. Sisk24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Northern Arizona University)
Abstract. We studied the effects of the edge between two forest types on the probability of occurrence of seven species of birds and found that four responded to the edge on only one side. Over 4 years, we measured the responses of forest birds to the edge between ponderosa pine forest undergoing restoration and neighboring untreated stands. Of the seven species analyzed, one occurred most frequently near the edge. Of the remaining six, none responded to the edge in the treated forest, but four ...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2007in Canadian Journal of Zoology 1.18
Jr.R.J. Fletcher Robert J. Fletcher1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Leslie Ries19
Estimated H-index: 19
+ 1 AuthorsAnna D. ChalfounA.D. Chalfoun1
Estimated H-index: 1
Over the past few decades, much research has focussed on the effects of habitat area (i.e., patch size) and edges in fragmented landscapes. We review and synthesize the literature on area and edge effects to identify whether the ecological processes influenced by patch size and edge are distinct, to summarize evidence for the relative effect of each, and to discuss how estimating their independent effects may be accomplished in field studies. Area and edge directly influence ecological processes...
126 Citations Source Cite
Leslie Ries19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Northern Arizona University),
Robert J. Fletcher22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Montana)
+ 1 AuthorsThomas D. Sisk24
Estimated H-index: 24
▪ Abstract Edge effects have been studied for decades because they are a key component to understanding how landscape structure influences habitat quality. However, making sense of the diverse patterns and extensive variability reported in the literature has been difficult because there has been no unifying conceptual framework to guide research. In this review, we identify four fundamental mechanisms that cause edge responses: ecological flows, access to spatially separated resources, resource ...
862 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2004in Conservation Biology 5.89
James Battin4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Northern Arizona University)
The concept of the ecological trap, a low-quality habitat that animals prefer over other available habitats of higher quality, has appeared in the ecological literature irregularly for over 30 years, but the topic has received relatively little attention, and evidence for traps remains largely anecdotal. Recently, however, the ecological trap concept has been the subject of a flurry of theoretical activity that is likely to raise its profile substantially, particularly in conservation biology. E...
611 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2003
Thomas D. Sisk1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
James Battin4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 3 AuthorsBarry R. Noon39
Estimated H-index: 39
Abstract : SERDP project CS1145 explored alternative control and assessment strategies for knapweeds and annual brome, two non-indigenous plant taxa, on US military installations. These plant taxa infest large areas of the Western United States and they are a major concern for military bases. Heavy maneuvering of troops and equipment causes large disturbances where native vegetation is stressed, soil is lost, and invasive noxious plants often take hold. Replacing stands of noxious weeds with nat...
Published on Dec 1, 2003
Thomas D. Sisk1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
James Battin4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 3 AuthorsBarry R. Noon39
Estimated H-index: 39
Abstract : Throughout southwestern North America, efforts are under way to reduce the risk of large-scale, high intensity fires and improve forest health through the implementation of forest restoration, a process of timber harvesting and prescribed burns designed to return the ponderosa pine forest ecosystem to a state similar to that in which it existed prior to European settlement of the Southwest. Restoration treatments produce a novel type of habitat edge the edge between treated and untrea...
Published on Jan 1, 2002in Studies in avian biology
Thomas D. Sisk24
Estimated H-index: 24
,
James Battin4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Northern Arizona University)
Habitat edges are an important feature in most terrestrial landscapes, due to increasing rates of habitat loss and fragmentation. A host of hypothesized influences of habitat edges on the distribution, abundance, and productivity of landbirds has been suggested over the past 60 years. Nevertheless, “edge effects” remains an ill-defined concept that encompasses a plethora of factors thought to influence avian ecology in heterogeneous landscapes. The vast majority of research on edge effects has b...
32 Citations
1