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Cristina Botías
University of Sussex
39Publications
22H-index
2,768Citations
Publications 39
Newest
#1Douglas B. Sponsler (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 4
#2Christina M. Grozinger (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 36
Last.Margaret R. Douglas (Dickinson College)H-Index: 7
view all 14 authors...
The relationship between pesticides and pollinators, while attracting no shortage of attention from scientists, regulators, and the public, has proven resistant to scientific synthesis and fractious in matters of policy and public opinion. This is in part because the issue has been approached in a compartmentalized and intradisciplinary way, such that evaluations of organismal pesticide effects remain largely disjoint from their upstream drivers and downstream consequences. Here, we present a so...
3 CitationsSource
#1Cristina BotíasH-Index: 22
#2Kate BasleyH-Index: 2
Last.Dave GoulsonH-Index: 64
view all 4 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Elizabeth Nicholls (University of Sussex)H-Index: 9
#2Cristina Botías (University of Sussex)H-Index: 22
Last.Dave Goulson (University of Sussex)H-Index: 64
view all 13 authors...
Concerns regarding the impact of neonicotinoid exposure on bee populations recently led to an EU-wide moratorium on the use of certain neonicotinoids on flowering crops. Currently evidence regarding the impact, if any, the moratorium has had on bees’ exposure is limited. We sampled pollen and nectar from bumblebee colonies in rural and peri-urban habitats in three UK regions; Stirlingshire, Hertfordshire and Sussex. Colonies were sampled over three years; prior to the ban (2013), during the init...
3 CitationsSource
#1C. Dance (University of Sussex)H-Index: 1
#2Cristina Botías (University of Sussex)H-Index: 22
Last.Dave Goulson (University of Sussex)H-Index: 64
view all 3 authors...
There is a pressing need to better understand the factors contributing to declines of wild pollinators such as bumblebees. Many different contributors have been postulated including: loss of flower-rich habitats and nesting sites; monotonous diets; impacts of invasive pathogens; exposure to pesticides such as neonicotinoids. Past research has tended to investigate the impacts of these stressors in isolation, despite the increasing recognition that bees are simultaneously exposed to a combination...
8 CitationsSource
#1Cristina Botías (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 22
#2Arthur David (French Institute of Health and Medical Research)H-Index: 14
Last.Dave Goulson (University of Sussex)H-Index: 64
view all 4 authors...
The increased use of pesticides has caused concern over the possible direct association of exposure to combinations of these compounds with bee health problems. There is growing proof that bees are regularly exposed to mixtures of agrochemicals, but most research has been focused on managed bees living in farmland, whereas little is known about exposure of wild bees, both in farmland and urban habitats. To determine exposure of wild bumblebees to pesticides in agricultural and urban environments...
42 CitationsSource
#1Cristina Botías (University of Sussex)H-Index: 22
#2Arthur David (University of Sussex)H-Index: 14
Last.David Goulson (University of Sussex)H-Index: 6
view all 4 authors...
Neonicotinoid insecticides are commonly-used as seed treatments on flowering crops such as oilseed rape. Their persistence and solubility in water increase the chances of environmental contamination via surface-runoff or drainage into areas adjacent to the crops. However, their uptake and fate into non-target vegetation remains poorly understood. In this study, we analysed samples of foliage collected from neonicotinoid seed-treated oilseed rape plants and also compared the levels of neonicotino...
58 CitationsSource
#1Saija PiiroinenH-Index: 10
#2Cristina BotíasH-Index: 22
Last.Dave GoulsonH-Index: 64
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In recent years, many pollinators have declined in abundance and diversity worldwide, presenting a potential threat to agricultural productivity, biodiversity and the functioning of natural ecosystems. One of the most debated factors proposed to be contributing to pollinator declines is exposure to pesticides, particularly neonicotinoids, a widely used class of systemic insecticide. Also, newly emerging parasites and diseases, thought to be spread via contact with managed honeybees, may pose thr...
11 CitationsSource
#1Arthur David (University of Sussex)H-Index: 14
#2Cristina Botías (University of Sussex)H-Index: 22
Last.Dave Goulson (University of Sussex)H-Index: 64
view all 7 authors...
There is considerable and ongoing debate as to the harm inflicted on bees by exposure to agricultural pesticides. In part, the lack of consensus reflects a shortage of information on field-realistic levels of exposure. Here, we quantify concentrations of neonicotinoid insecticides and fungicides in the pollen of oilseed rape, and in pollen of wildflowers growing near arable fields. We then compare this to concentrations of these pesticides found in pollen collected by honey bees and in pollen an...
106 CitationsSource
#1Cristina BotíasH-Index: 22
#2Arthur DavidH-Index: 14
Last.Dave GoulsonH-Index: 64
view all 7 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Cristina BotíasH-Index: 22
#2Arthur DavidH-Index: 14
Last.Dave GoulsonH-Index: 64
view all 7 authors...
In recent years, an intense debate about the environmental risks posed by neonicotinoids, a group of widely used, neurotoxic insecticides, has been joined. When these systemic compounds are applied to seeds, low concentrations are subsequently found in the nectar and pollen of the crop, which are then collected and consumed by bees. Here we demonstrate that the current focus on exposure to pesticides via the crop overlooks an important factor: throughout spring and summer, mixtures of neonicotin...
136 CitationsSource
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