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Jeff E. Houlahan
University of New Brunswick
EcologyAmphibianPopulationSpecies richnessBiology
50Publications
21H-index
3,269Citations
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Publications 51
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#1Jeff E. Houlahan (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 21
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#1Joseph F. MudgeH-Index: 6
#2Jeff E. Houlahan (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 21
Traditional study design tools for estimating appropriate sample sizes are not consistently used in ecology and can lead to low statistical power to detect biologically relevant effects. We have developed a new approach to estimating optimal sample sizes, requiring only three parameters; a maximum acceptable average of α and β, a critical effect size of minimum biological relevance, and an estimate of the relative costs of Type I vs. Type II errors.This approach can be used to show the general c...
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#1Jeff E. Houlahan (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 21
#2David J. Currie (Carleton College)H-Index: 41
Last. Steven M. WondzellH-Index: 28
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Effects of species diversity on population and community stability (or more precisely, the effects of species richness on temporal variability) have been studied for several decades, but there have been no large-scale tests in natural communities of predictions from theory. We used 91 data sets including plants, fish, small mammals, zooplankton, birds, and insects, to examine the relationship between species richness and temporal variability in populations and communities. Seventy-eight of 91 da...
4 CitationsSource
#1Paul Crump (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 3
#2Keith A. Berven (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 21
Last. Jeff E. Houlahan (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 21
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Estimating abundance is critical in many areas of ecology and conservation biology. Despite this, methodological limitations prevent population monitoring at large spatial scales. Automated acoustic methods, such as recording devices and sound recognition models, can determine occupancy and phenology but have not been utilized to estimate abundance in amphibians. Here we evaluate a method to estimate the number of breeding female Wood Frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) on the basis of the re...
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#1Paul Crump (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 3
#2Jeff E. Houlahan (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 21
For many species, the distribution and quantity of habitat is likely to be altered under climate change scenarios. Globally, temperatures are expected to increase, but changes in precipitation will be variable with some locations expected to receive more and other locations to receive less. The amount and timing of precipitation has a strong influence on wetland hydroperiod, which is a critical factor in determining wetland use by species of pond-breeding amphibians. Past research has focused on...
2 CitationsSource
#1J. F. Mudge (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 1
#2Christopher J. Martyniuk (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 29
Last. Jeff E. Houlahan (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 21
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Abstract Background Transcriptomic approaches (microarray and RNA-seq) have been a tremendous advance for molecular science in all disciplines, but they have made interpretation of hypothesis testing more difficult because of the large number of comparisons that are done within an experiment. The result has been a proliferation of techniques aimed at solving the multiple comparisons problem, techniques that have focused primarily on minimizing Type I error with little or no concern about concomi...
9 CitationsSource
#1Paul Crump (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 3
#2Jeff E. Houlahan (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 21
Advances in bioacoustic technology, such as the use of automatic recording devices, allow wildlife monitoring at large spatial scales. However, such technology can produce enormous amounts of audio data that must be processed and analyzed. One potential solution to this problem is the use of automated sound recognition tools, but we lack a general framework for developing and validating these tools. Recognizers are computer models of an animal sound assembled from “training data” (i.e., actual s...
3 CitationsSource
#1Stephanie D. Graves (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 2
#2Karen A. Kidd (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 41
Last. Kelly R. Munkittrick (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 38
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Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site (KNPNHS), Nova Scotia, Canada, is considered a biological mercury (Hg) hotspot because the tissues of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and common loons (Gavia immer) inhabiting the lakes frequently exceed “safe” levels of Hg. In this study, the relationships between Hg and overall health of males and females of three forage fish species (brown bullhead Ameirus nebulosus, banded killifish Fundulus diaphanus and golden shiner Notemigonus crysoleuc...
5 CitationsSource
#1Paul Crump (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 3
#2Jeff E. Houlahan (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 21
Abstract We used removal sampling (RS) and neutral red dye capture–mark–recapture (CMR) methods to estimate capture probabilities for larval Wood Frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus), Spring Peepers (Pseudacris crucifer), and first-year Green Frogs (Lithobates clamitans) in ponds in southern New Brunswick, Canada. We modeled capture probability as a function of environmental variables and tested whether marks were retained between surveys. We also performed simulations to understand the effect of surve...
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#1Jeff E. Houlahan (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 21
#2Shawn T. McKinney (UMaine: University of Maine)H-Index: 1
Last. Brian J. McGill (UMaine: University of Maine)H-Index: 41
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The objective of science is to understand the natural world; we argue that prediction is the only way to demonstrate scientific understanding, implying that prediction should be a fundamental aspect of all scientific disciplines. Reproducibility is an essential requirement of good science and arises from the ability to develop models that make accurate predictions on new data. Ecology, however, with a few exceptions, has abandoned prediction as a central focus and faces its own crisis of reprodu...
65 CitationsSource
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