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Tamar R. Makin
University of Oxford
PsychologyNeuroscienceSomatosensory systemCognitive psychologySensory system
55Publications
20H-index
1,564Citations
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Publications 79
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#1Paulina Kieliba (UCL: University College London)
#2Danielle Clode (UCL: University College London)
Last. Tamar R. Makin (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 20
view all 4 authors...
From hand tools to cyborgs, humans have long been fascinated by the opportunities afforded by augmenting ourselves. Here, we studied how motor augmentation with an extra robotic thumb (the Third Thumb) impacts the biological hand representation in the brains of able-bodied people. Participants were tested on a variety of behavioural and neuroimaging tests designed to interrogate the augmented hand9s representation before and after 5-days of semi-intensive training. Training improved the Thumb9s ...
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#1Roni O. Maimon Mor (University of Oxford)
#2Tamar R. Makin (University of Oxford)H-Index: 20
The potential ability of the human brain to represent an artificial limb as a body part (embodiment) has been inspiring engineers, clinicians, and scientists as a means to optimise human–machine interfaces. Using functional MRI (fMRI), we studied whether neural embodiment actually occurs in prosthesis users’ occipitotemporal cortex (OTC). Compared with controls, different prostheses types were visually represented more similarly to each other, relative to hands and tools, indicating the emergenc...
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#1Tamar R. Makin (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 20
#2Herta Flor (UMA: University of Mannheim)H-Index: 96
Abstract Following arm amputation the region that represented the missing hand in primary somatosensory cortex (S1) becomes deprived of its primary input, resulting in changed boundaries of the S1 body map. This remapping process has been termed ‘reorganisation’ and has been attributed to multiple mechanisms, including increased expression of previously masked inputs. In a maladaptive plasticity model, such reorganisation has been associated with phantom limb pain (PLP). Brain activity associate...
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#1Roni O. Maimon-Mor (University of Oxford)H-Index: 1
#2Emeka Obasi (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 1
Last. Tamar R. Makin (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 20
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When people talk, they move their hands to enhance meaning. Here we ask whether people spontaneously use their artificial limbs (prostheses) to gesture, and whether prosthesis gesture behaviour relates to everyday prosthesis use and perceived embodiment. One-handed participants with congenital and acquired hand loss and two-handed controls participated in gesture-facilitating tasks, measured using acceleration monitors and further validated with offline video coding. Everyday functional prosthes...
2 CitationsSource
#1Roni O. Maimon-Mor (University of Oxford)H-Index: 1
#1Roni O. Maimon-Mor (UCL: University College London)
Last. Tamar R. Makin (University of Oxford)H-Index: 20
view all 5 authors...
Abstract The ‘embodied cognition’ framework proposes that our motor repertoire shapes visual perception and cognition. But recent studies showing normal visual body representation in individuals born without hands challenges the contribution of motor control on visual body representation. Here, we studied hand laterality judgements in three groups with fundamentally different visual and motor hand experiences: two-handed controls, one-handers born without a hand (congenital one-handers) and one-...
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#1Avital Hahamy (Weizmann Institute of Science)H-Index: 8
#2Tamar R. Makin (University of Oxford)H-Index: 20
A fundamental organizing principle in the somatosensory and motor systems is somatotopy, where specific body parts are represented separately and adjacently to other body parts, resulting in a body map. Different terminals of the sensorimotor network show varied somatotopic layouts, in which the relative position, distance and overlap between body-part representations differ. Since somatotopy is best characterized in the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices, these terminals have be...
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6 CitationsSource
#1Tamar R. Makin (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 20
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#1Harriet Dempsey-Jones (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 4
#2Daan B. Wesselink (University of Oxford)H-Index: 2
Last. Tamar R. Makin (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 20
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Summary Although the fine-grained features of topographic maps in the somatosensory cortex can be shaped by everyday experience, it is unknown whether behavior can support the expression of somatotopic maps where they do not typically occur. Unlike the fingers, represented in all primates, individuated toe maps have only been found in non-human primates. Using 1-mm resolution fMRI, we identify organized toe maps in two individuals born without either upper limb who use their feet to substitute m...
3 CitationsSource
#1Zeena-britt Sanders (UCL: University College London)
#2Daan B Wesselink (UCL: University College London)
Last. Tamar R. Makin (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 20
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Scientists traditionally use passive stimulation to examine organisational properties of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI). Recent research has, however, emphasised the close and bidirectional relationship between somatosensory and motor systems. This suggests active contributions (e.g., direct inputs from the motor system to SI) should also be considered when studying SI representations. Under such a framework, discrepant results are possible when different tasks are used to study the same ...
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