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Adenike A. Adewuyi
Northwestern University
6Publications
4H-index
70Citations
Publications 6
Newest
#1Adenike A. Adewuyi (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 4
#2Levi J. Hargrove (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 29
Last.Todd A. KuikenH-Index: 40
view all 3 authors...
Background The use of pattern recognition-based methods to control myoelectric upper-limb prostheses has been well studied in individuals with high-level amputations but few studies have demonstrated that it is suitable for partial-hand amputees, who often possess a functional wrist. This study’s objective was to evaluate strategies that allow partial-hand amputees to control a prosthetic hand while allowing retain wrist function.
#1Adenike A. Adewuyi (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 4
#2Levi J. Hargrove (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 29
Last.Todd A. KuikenH-Index: 40
view all 3 authors...
Pattern recognition-based myoelectric control of upper limb prostheses has the potential to restore control of multiple degrees of freedom. Though this control method has been extensively studied in individuals with higher-level amputations, few studies have investigated its effectiveness for individuals with partial-hand amputations. Most partial-hand amputees retain a functional wrist and the ability of pattern recognition-based methods to correctly classify hand motions from different wrist p...
#1Adenike A. Adewuyi (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago)H-Index: 4
#2Levi J. Hargrove (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago)H-Index: 29
Last.Todd A. Kuiken (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago)H-Index: 40
view all 3 authors...
Pattern recognition control combined with surface electromyography (EMG) from the extrinsic hand muscles has shown great promise for control of multiple prosthetic functions for transradial amputees. There is, however, a need to adapt this control method when implemented for partial-hand amputees, who possess both a functional wrist and information-rich residual intrinsic hand muscles. We demonstrate that combining EMG data from both intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles to classify hand grasps a...
Aug 1, 2014 in EMBC (International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society)
#1Eric J. Earley (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago)H-Index: 1
#2Adenike A. Adewuyi (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago)H-Index: 4
Last.Levi J. Hargrove (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago)H-Index: 29
view all 3 authors...
Partial-hand amputees often retain good residual wrist motion, which is essential for functional activities involving use of the hand. Thus, a crucial design criterion for a myoelectric, partial-hand prosthesis control scheme is that it allows the user to retain residual wrist motion. Pattern recognition (PR) of electromyographic (EMG) signals is a well-studied method of controlling myoelectric prostheses. However, wrist motion degrades a PR system’s ability to correctly predict hand-grasp patte...
#1Adenike A. Adewuyi (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago)H-Index: 4
#2Levi J. Hargrove (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago)H-Index: 29
Last.Todd A. Kuiken (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago)H-Index: 40
view all 3 authors...
Pattern-recognition-based control using surface electromyography (EMG) from the extrinsic hand muscles has shown great promise for providing control of multiple prosthetic functions. However, it is not clear how these systems will perform when the user possesses a functional wrist; an attribute unique to the population of partial-hand amputees. Fortunately, partial-hand amputees may have remaining intrinsic hand muscles, from which additional information-rich EMG data may be extracted and used f...
#1Rajiv Ranganathan (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago)H-Index: 15
#2Adenike A. Adewuyi (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
A key issue in motor control is to understand how the motor system chooses a solution from the multiple solutions that exist to achieve any particular task goal. One hypothesis is that redundancy may be resolved by minimizing movement-related costs. However, testing this prediction in motor learning has been problematic in simple laboratory tasks, like reaching, because the motor system already has extensive prior knowledge about redundancy in these tasks. Here, we used a novel task where health...
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