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Peter E. Clayson
University of South Florida
Developmental psychologyPsychologyCognitionCognitive psychologySocial psychology
35Publications
20H-index
1,193Citations
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Publications 35
Newest
#1Peter E. Clayson (USF: University of South Florida)H-Index: 20
#2Kaylie A. Carbine (BYU: Brigham Young University)H-Index: 7
Last. Michael J. Larson (BYU: Brigham Young University)H-Index: 36
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Performance-monitoring event-related brain potentials (ERPs), such as the error-related negativity (ERN) and reward positivity (RewP), are advocated as biomarkers of depression symptoms and risk. However, a recent meta-analysis indicated effect size heterogeneity in the ERN and RewP literatures. Hence, advocating these ERPs as biomarkers of depression might be premature or possibly misguided due to the selective reporting of significant analyses on the part of researchers (e.g., p-hacki...
3 CitationsSource
#1Peter E. ClaysonH-Index: 20
#2Jonathan K. WynnH-Index: 31
Last. William P. HoranH-Index: 53
view all 6 authors...
: Disturbances in motivation are prominent in the clinical presentation of people with schizophrenia and might reflect a disturbance in reward processing. Recent advances in affective neuroscience have subdivided reward processing into distinct components, but there are two limitations of the prior work in schizophrenia. First, studies typically focus on only one component rather than on the unfolding of reward processing across multiple stages. Second, studies have not considered the impact of ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Peter E. Clayson (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 20
#2Kaylie A. Carbine (BYU: Brigham Young University)H-Index: 7
Last. Michael J. Larson (BYU: Brigham Young University)H-Index: 36
view all 4 authors...
: Methodological reporting guidelines for studies of ERPs were updated in Psychophysiology in 2014. These guidelines facilitate the communication of key methodological parameters (e.g., preprocessing steps). Failing to report key parameters represents a barrier to replication efforts, and difficulty with replicability increases in the presence of small sample sizes and low statistical power. We assessed whether guidelines are followed and estimated the average sample size and power in recent res...
6 CitationsSource
#1Peter E. Clayson (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 20
#2Michael J. Larson (BYU: Brigham Young University)H-Index: 36
Abstract The impact of affective context on performance-monitoring aspects of cognitive control is not clear, and findings in the literature are contradictory. The contradictory findings might be due to failing to consider the impact of recent and concurrent affective contexts, participant ratings of emotional images, and the distinct impact of emotional arousal and valence. The present study utilized multilevel modeling (MLM) on person-specific ratings of arousal and valence to determine how re...
Source
#1Peter E. Clayson (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 20
#2Robert S. Kern (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 43
Last. Michael F. Green (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 91
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Abstract Studies demonstrate that dynamic assessment (i.e., learning potential) improves the prediction of response to rehabilitation over static measures in individuals with schizophrenia. Learning potential is most commonly assessed using neuropsychological tests under a test-train-test paradigm to examine change in performance. Novel learning potential approaches using social cognitive tasks may have added value, particularly for the prediction of social functioning, but this area is unexplor...
1 CitationsSource
#1Alexandra C. Reed (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 1
#2Jessica I. Lake (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 10
Last. Cindy M. Yee (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 23
view all 9 authors...
Source
#1Ann Clawson (BYU: Brigham Young University)H-Index: 10
#2Peter E. Clayson (BYU: Brigham Young University)H-Index: 20
Last. Michael J. Larson (BYU: Brigham Young University)H-Index: 36
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Cognitive control includes higher-level cognitive processes used to evaluate environmental conflict. Given the importance of cognitive control in regulating behavior, understanding the developmental course of these processes may contribute to a greater understanding of normal and abnormal development. We examined behavioral (response times [RTs], error rates) and event-related potential data (N2, error-related negativity [ERN], correct-response negativity [CRN], error positivity [Pe]) d...
8 CitationsSource
#1Peter E. Clayson (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 20
#2Gregory A. Miller (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 55
Abstract Failing to consider psychometric issues related to reliability and validity, differential deficits, and statistical power potentially undermines the conclusions of a study. In research using event-related brain potentials (ERPs), numerous contextual factors (population sampled, task, data recording, analysis pipeline, etc.) can impact the reliability of ERP scores. The present review considers the contextual factors that influence ERP score reliability and the downstream effects that re...
20 CitationsSource
#1Peter E. Clayson (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 20
#2Gregory A. Miller (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 55
Abstract Generalizability theory (G theory) provides a flexible, multifaceted approach to estimating score reliability. G theory's approach to estimating score reliability has important advantages over classical test theory that are relevant for research using event-related brain potentials (ERPs). For example, G theory does not require parallel forms (i.e., equal means, variances, and covariances), can handle unbalanced designs, and provides a single reliability estimate for designs with multip...
21 CitationsSource
#1Michael J. Larson (BYU: Brigham Young University)H-Index: 36
#2Peter E. Clayson (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 20
Last. Daniel H. Weissman (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 29
view all 4 authors...
The congruency effect in Stroop-like tasks (i.e., increased response time and reduced accuracy in incongruent relative to congruent trials) is often smaller when the previous trial was incongruent as compared to congruent. This congruency sequence effect (CSE) is thought to reflect cognitive control processes that shift attention to the target and/or modulate the response engendered by the distracter differently after incongruent relative to congruent trials. The neural signatures of CSEs are th...
10 CitationsSource
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