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Herbert van Amerongen
Wageningen University and Research Centre
188Publications
46H-index
6,225Citations
Publications 188
Newest
#1Reza Ranjbar Choubeh (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 2
#2Leeat Bar-Eyal (HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem)H-Index: 2
Last.Herbert van Amerongen (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 46
view all 6 authors...
Cyanobacteria living in the harsh environment of the desert have to protect themselves against high light intensity and prevent photodamage. These cyanobacteria are in a desiccated state during the largest part of the day when both temperature and light intensity are high. In the desiccated state, their photosynthetic activity is stopped, whereas upon rehydration the ability to perform photosynthesis is regained. Earlier reports indicate that light-induced excitations in Leptolyngbya ohadii are ...
#1Peter Bos (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)
#2Anniek Oosterwijk (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)
Last.Emilie Wientjes (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Light drives photosynthesis. In plants it is absorbed by light-harvesting antenna complexes associated with Photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). As PSI and PSII work in series, it is important that the excitation pressure on the two photosystems is balanced. When plants are exposed to illumination that overexcites PSII, a special pool of the major light-harvesting complex LHCII is phosphorylated and moves from PSII to PSI (state 2). If instead PSI is over-excited the LHCII com...
#1Tomas E. van den Berg (VU: VU University Amsterdam)H-Index: 1
#2Volha U. Chukhutsina (VU: VU University Amsterdam)H-Index: 7
Last.Bart van Oort (VU: VU University Amsterdam)H-Index: 5
view all 5 authors...
In contrast to single cellular species, detailed information is lacking on the processes of photosynthetic acclimation for colonial algae, although these algae are important for biofuel production, ecosystem biodiversity, and wastewater treatment. To investigate differences between single cellular and colonial species, we studied the regulation of photosynthesis and photoprotection during photoacclimation for the colonial green alga Botryococcus braunii and made a comparison with the properties ...
#1Reza Ranjbar Choubeh (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 2
#2Rob B. M. Koehorst (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 18
Last.Herbert van Amerongen (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 46
view all 6 authors...
Abstract During the millions of years of evolution, photosynthetic organisms have adapted to almost all terrestrial and aquatic habitats, although some environments are obviously more suitable for photosynthesis than others. Photosynthetic organisms living in low-light conditions require on the one hand a large light-harvesting apparatus to absorb as many photons as possible. On the other hand, the excitation trapping time scales with the size of the light-harvesting system, and the longer the d...
#1Reza Ranjbar Choubeh (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 2
#2Emilie Wientjes (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 4
Last.Herbert van Amerongen (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 46
view all 5 authors...
Cyanobacteria use chlorophyll and phycobiliproteins to harvest light. The resulting excitation energy is delivered to reaction centers (RCs), where photochemistry starts. The relative amounts of excitation energy arriving at the RCs of photosystem I (PSI) and II (PSII) depend on the spectral composition of the light. To balance the excitations in both photosystems, cyanobacteria perform state transitions to equilibrate the excitation energy. They go to state I if PSI is preferentially excited, f...
#1Lucilla Taddei (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 3
#2Volha U. Chukhutsina (VU: VU University Amsterdam)H-Index: 7
Last.Angela Falciatore (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 23
view all 10 authors...
Marine diatoms are prominent phytoplankton organisms that perform photosynthesis in extremely variable environments. Diatoms possess a strong ability to dissipate excess absorbed energy as heat via nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). This process relies on changes in carotenoid pigment composition (xanthophyll cycle) and on specific members of the light-harvesting complex family specialized in photoprotection (LHCXs), which potentially act as NPQ effectors. However, the link between light stress, ...
#1Kieran F. Fox (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 3
#2Caner Ünlü (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 5
Last.Christopher D. P. Duffy (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 16
view all 9 authors...
Abstract The bioenergetics of light-harvesting by photosynthetic antenna proteins in higher plants is well understood. However, investigation into the regulatory non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) mechanism, which dissipates excess energy in high light, has led to several conflicting models. It is generally accepted that the major photosystem II antenna protein, LHCII, is the site of NPQ, although the minor antenna complexes (CP24/26/29) are also proposed as alternative/additional NPQ sites. LHCI...
#1Shazia Farooq (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 4
#2Jevgenij Chmeliov (Vilnius University)H-Index: 13
Last.Herbert van Amerongen (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 46
view all 8 authors...
Photosystem II of higher plants is protected against light damage by thermal dissipation of excess excitation energy, a process that can be monitored through non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence. When the light intensity is lowered, non-photochemical quenching largely disappears on a time scale ranging from tens of seconds to many minutes. With the use of picosecond fluorescence spectroscopy, we demonstrate that one of the underlying mechanisms is only functional when the reac...
#1Anjali Pandit (LEI: Leiden University)H-Index: 13
#2I.H.M. van Stokkum (VU: VU University Amsterdam)H-Index: 56
Last.Roberta Croce (VU: VU University Amsterdam)H-Index: 35
view all 4 authors...
#1Reza Ranjbar Choubeh (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 2
#2Ravi R. Sonani (SPU: Sardar Patel University)H-Index: 12
Last.Herbert van Amerongen (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 46
view all 7 authors...
Cyanobacteria perform photosynthesis with the use of large light-harvesting antennae called phycobilisomes (PBSs). These hemispherical PBSs contain hundreds of open-chain tetrapyrrole chromophores bound to different peptides, providing an arrangement in which excitation energy is funnelled towards the PBS core from where it can be transferred to photosystem I and/or photosystem II. In the PBS core, many allophycocyanin (APC) trimers are present, red-light-absorbing phycobiliproteins that covalen...
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