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Timothy G. Dinan
University College Cork
PsychiatryEndocrinologyPsychologyMedicineBiology
682Publications
88H-index
34kCitations
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Publications 679
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#1Jacinta Walsh (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 1
#2Loreto Olavarria-Ramirez (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 2
Last. Gerard Clarke (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 47
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The gastrointestinal tract houses a reservoir of bacterial-derived enzymes which can directly catalyze the metabolism of drugs, dietary elements, and endogenous molecules. Both host and environmental factors may influence this enzymatic activity, with the potential to dictate the availability of the biologically-active form of endogenous molecules in the gut and influence inter-individual variation in drug metabolism. We aimed to investigate the influence of the microbiota, and the modulation of...
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#1Emily M. Teichman (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 1
#2Kenneth J. O'Riordan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 2
Last. John F. Cryan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 91
view all 5 authors...
The microbiota-gut-brain axis encompasses a bidirectional mode of communication between the microorganisms residing in our gut, and our brain function and behavior. The composition of the gut microbiota is subject to diurnal variation and is entrained by host circadian rhythms. In turn, a diverse microbiota is essential for optimal regulation of host circadian pathways. Disruption of the cyclical nature of this microbe-host interaction profoundly influences disease pathology and severity. This r...
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#1Paul M. Ryan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 7
#2Elaine Patterson (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 8
Last. R. Paul Ross (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 73
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Abstract Objectives Recent evidence indicates that gut microbiota is altered considerably by a variety of commonly prescribed medications. This study assessed the impact of 2 antidiabetic therapeutics on gut microbiota and markers of cardiometabolic disease in metabolically dysfunctional mice. Methods C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet for 24 weeks while receiving 1 of 2 antidiabetic therapeutics—metformin or dipeptidase peptidyl-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, PKF-275-055—for the final 12 weeks. Mice w...
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#1Caitlin S. M. Cowan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 7
#2Timothy G. Dinan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 88
Last. John F. Cryan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 91
view all 3 authors...
The gut microbiota is a vast, complex, and fascinating ecosystem of microorganisms that resides in the human gastrointestinal tract. As an integral part of the microbiota-gut-brain axis, it is now being recognized that the microbiota is a modulator of brain and behavior, across species. Intriguingly, periods of change in the microbiota coincide with the development of other body systems and particularly the brain. We hypothesize that these times of parallel development are biologically relevant,...
2 CitationsSource
#1Christine FullingH-Index: 2
#2Gilliard Lach (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 1
Last. John F. CryanH-Index: 91
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Abstract Adolescence is a critical developmental period that is characterised by growth spurts and specific neurobiological, neuroimmune and behavioural changes. In tandem the gut microbiota, which is a key player in the regulation of health and disease, is shaped during this time period. Diet is one of the most important regulators of microbiota composition. Thus, we hypothesised that dietary disturbances of the microbiota during this critical time window may result in long-lasting changes in i...
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#1Paul M. Ryan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 7
#2Elaine Patterson (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 8
Last. Timothy G. Dinan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 88
view all 14 authors...
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#1Marcel van de Wouw (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 5
#2Joshua M. Lyte (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 3
Last. John F. Cryan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 91
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Abstract There has been a growing recognition of the involvement of the gastrointestinal microbiota in the development of stress-related disorders. Acute stress leads to activation of the neuroendocrine systems, which in turn orchestrate a large-scale redistribution of innate immune cells. Both these response systems are independently known to be primed by the microbiota, even though much is still unclear about the role of the gastrointestinal microbiota in acute stress-induced immune activation...
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#1Siobhain M. O'Mahony (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 23
#2Karen-Anne McVey Neufeld (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 4
Last. John F. Cryan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 91
view all 13 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1John F. Cryan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 91
#2Kenneth J. O'Riordan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 2
Last. Timothy G. Dinan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 88
view all 5 authors...
Summary Research into the role of the gut microbiome in modulating brain function has rapidly increased over the past 10 years, albeit chiefly in animal models. Increasing clinical and preclinical evidence implicates the microbiome as a possible key susceptibility factor for neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, autism spectrum disorder, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and stroke. Cross-sectional clinical studies are bolstering the concept of altered microbial compositi...
6 CitationsSource
#1Timothy G. Dinan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 88
#2John F. Cryan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 91
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