Alice H. Amsden
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
68Publications
23H-index
6,925Citations
Publications 68
Newest
Published on Apr 14, 2014
Alice H. Amsden23
Estimated H-index: 23
Source Cite
Published on Sep 20, 2012
Alice H. Amsden23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Alisa DiCaprio2
Estimated H-index: 2
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2011in Development Policy Review 1.40
Justin Yifu Lin39
Estimated H-index: 39
(World Bank),
Célestin Monga10
Estimated H-index: 10
(World Bank)
+ 5 AuthorsWonhyuk Lim3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Korea Development Institute)
This DPR Debate is based on the contribution by Justin Lin, Chief Economist at the World Bank, and his colleague Celestin Monga, on ‘Growth Identification and Facilitation: The Role of the State in the Dynamics of Structural Change’. The article under consideration is important and timely as it articulates a number of new policy implications from Justin Lin's earlier work on New Structural Economics, which was discussed in a previous DPR debate (Lin and Chang, 2009). This symposium contains the ...
63 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2010in Journal of Human Development and Capabilities 0.76
Alice H. Amsden23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Grass roots methods of poverty alleviation will fail unless jobs are created or stimulated by governments (whether central or local). In the presence of high unemployment at all levels, improving the capabilities of job seekers (making them better fed and housed and educated) will only lead to more unemployment and not to more paid employment or self-employment above the subsistence level (call this the 'Kerala Effect'). To believe that improving only the supply side of the labor market is enoug...
48 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2009in Developing Economies 0.56
Alice H. Amsden23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2009
1 Citations
Published on Jun 29, 2007
Alice H. Amsden23
Estimated H-index: 23
The American government has been both miracle worker and villain in the developing world. From the end of World War II until the 1980s poor countries, including many in Africa and the Middle East, enjoyed a modicum of economic growth. New industries mushroomed and skilled jobs multiplied, thanks in part to flexible American policies that showed an awareness of the diversity of Third World countries and an appreciation for their long-standing knowledge about how their own economies worked. Then d...
100 Citations
Published on Oct 1, 2007in Challenge
Alice H. Amsden23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
The United States has had two empires. Under the first, from roughly 1950 to 1980, it was too busy to bother controlling the policies of the developing world. Under this regime, poorer countries did relatively well. In the second empire, which has reigned since then, it has felt obliged to set those policies, and poorer countries have done relatively poorly. Is there a connection? Yes, says this specialist from MIT.
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2004in OUP Catalogue
Alice H. Amsden23
Estimated H-index: 23
After World War II a select number of countries outside Japan and the West--those that Alice Amsden calls "the rest"--gained market share in modern industries and altered global competition. By 2000, a great divide had developed within "the rest", the lines drawn according to prewar manufacturing experience and equality in income distribution. China, India, Korea and Taiwan had built their own national manufacturing enterprises that were investing heavily in R&D. Their developmental states had t...
840 Citations
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