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Olivia F. O’Leary
University College Cork
EndocrinologyHippocampal formationPsychologyAntidepressantNeurogenesis
59Publications
21H-index
2,197Citations
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Publications 62
Newest
#1Joana S. Cruz-Pereira (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 1
Last. John F. CryanH-Index: 91
view all 6 authors...
Depression remains one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders, with many patients not responding adequately to available treatments. Chronic or early-life stress is one of the key risk factors...
2 CitationsSource
#1O'Donovan Sm (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 1
#2Erin K. Crowley (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 3
Last. Cora O'Neill (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 23
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1 CitationsSource
#1Lauren C. Pawley (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 1
#2Cara M. Hueston (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 9
Last. Yvonne M. Nolan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 28
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Both neuroinflammation and adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) are implicated in many neurodegenerative disorders as well as in neuropsychiatric disorders, which often become symptomatic during adolescence. A better knowledge of the impact that chronic neuroinflammation has on the hippocampus during the adolescent period could lead to the discovery of new therapeutics for some of these disorders. The hippocampus is particularly vulnerable to altered concentrations of the pro-inflammato...
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#1Olivia F. O’LearyH-Index: 21
#2John F. CryanH-Index: 91
Abstract In the central nervous system, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) acts on two types of receptors: ionotropic GABAA and GABAC receptors and metabotropic GABAB receptors. Functional GABAB receptors are heterodimers of GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits, and in the brain the GABAB1 subunit is expressed as two main isoforms, GABAB1a and GABAB1b. In this chapter, we summarize the evidence of a role for the GABAB receptor in depression and the response to stress and antidepressant drugs. We then review t...
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#1Olivia F. O’Leary (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 21
#2Martin G. Codagnone (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 2
Last. John F. Cryan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 91
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Abstract 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) is a major neurotransmitter involved in the modulation of behavior and the manifestation of various psychiatric disorders, and is a pharmacological target in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. The physiological effects of serotonin are modulated by a variety of proteins that regulate its synthesis, storage, release, uptake, and degradation. In addition, serotonin signaling is mediated by at least 14 distinct receptors. Alterations in...
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#1Cara M. HuestonH-Index: 9
#2James D. O'LearyH-Index: 4
Last. Yvonne M. NolanH-Index: 28
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#1Ana Paula Ramos Costa (UFSC: Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina)
#2Brunno R. Levone (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 2
Last. John F. Cryan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 91
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Abstract The cholinergic system is one of the most important neurotransmitter systems in the brain with key roles in autonomic control and the regulation of cognitive and emotional responses. However, the precise mechanism by which the cholinergic system influences behaviour is unclear. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) is a potential mediator in this context based on evidence, which has identified this process as putative mechanism of antidepressant action. More recently, post-transcriptiona...
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#1Daniela FeliceH-Index: 6
#2Anand GururajanH-Index: 11
Last. John F. CryanH-Index: 91
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#1James D. O'Leary (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 4
#2Alan E. Hoban (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 10
Last. Yvonne M. Nolan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 28
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3 CitationsSource
#1James D. O'Leary (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 4
#2Alan E. Hoban (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 10
Last. Yvonne M. Nolan (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 28
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Adolescence is a critical period for postnatal brain maturation and a time during which there is increased susceptibility to developing emotional and cognitive-related disorders. Exercise during adulthood has been shown to increase hippocampal plasticity and enhance cognition. However, the impact of exercise initiated in adolescence, on brain and behaviour in adulthood is not yet fully explored or understood. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of voluntary exercise that was...
5 CitationsSource
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