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Anja C. Niewind
University of Toronto
Food choiceBrassicaFood scienceMedicineBiology
3Publications
3H-index
50Citations
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Publications 3
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#1Anja C. Niewind (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 3
#2Magdalena Krondl (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 12
Last. Daisy Lau (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 6
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5 CitationsSource
#1Anja C. Niewind (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 3
#2Magdalena Krondl (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 12
Last. Michelle Shrott (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
Abstract The relative influence of a genetic trait, the ability to taste phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), on rating bitterness of cabbage and liking it, and on the use of Brassica vegetables was examined among 32 subjectively healthy women, 53 to 76 years of age. Sensitivity to PTC was assessed with a forced choice staircase procedure. Flavour intensity and hedonic ratings of cabbage in raw and cooked form were obtained by quantitative descriptive analysis techniques. Frequency of use of Brassica vege...
40 CitationsSource
#1Anja C. Niewind (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 3
#2Magdalena Krondl (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 12
Last. Tena Van't Foort (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
Similarities and differences in the food combinations of Chinese (N=18), European (N=10) and West Indian women (N=11) were assessed using a taxonomic grid. Four central foods with confirmed use (French fries, Brussels sprouts, chicken and Cola beverages) were evaluated, for compatibility with 40 other foods representing staple foods, meats and alternates, vegetables and beverages. Dual scaling analysis was employed. Results showed that differences in food combinations outnumbered similarities. W...
5 CitationsSource
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