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Vivian Budnik
University of Massachusetts Medical School
86Publications
48H-index
7,731Citations
Publications 87
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#1Vivian Budnik (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 48
#2Travis C. Thomson (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 9
Recent findings unveil a viral-like mechanism for the transmission of synaptic plasticity signals involving the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc). Arc forms capsid-like particles that package RNA and are transported across synapses. Here Erlendsson et al. present a high-resolution structural representation of Arc capsids, enabling deeper analysis of their function.
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#1Baojin Ding (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 12
#2Anne M. Mirza (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 16
Last.Mary Munson (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 27
view all 5 authors...
In eukaryotes, subsets of exported mRNAs are organized into large ribonucleoprotein (megaRNP) granules. How megaRNPs exit the nucleus is unclear, as their diameters are much larger than the nuclear pore complex (NPC) central channel. We previously identified a non-canonical nuclear export mechanism in Drosophila (Speese et al., Cell 2012) and mammals (Ding et al., in preparation), in which megaRNPs exit the nucleus by budding across nuclear envelope (NE) membranes. Here, we present evidence for ...
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#1James A. Ashley (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 16
#2Benjamin Cordy (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 1
Last.Travis C. Thomson (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 9
view all 6 authors...
Summary Arc/Arg3.1 is required for synaptic plasticity and cognition, and mutations in this gene are linked to autism and schizophrenia. Arc bears a domain resembling retroviral/retrotransposon Gag-like proteins, which multimerize into a capsid that packages viral RNA. The significance of such a domain in a plasticity molecule is uncertain. Here, we report that the Drosophila Arc1 protein forms capsid-like structures that bind darc1 mRNA in neurons and is loaded into extracellular vesicles that ...
85 CitationsSource
#1Anup Parchure (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 3
#2Mary Munson (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 27
Last.Vivian Budnik (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 48
view all 3 authors...
Summary A pivotal feature of long-lasting synaptic plasticity is the localization of RNAs and the protein synthesis machinery at synaptic sites. How and where ribonucleoprotein (RNP) transport granules that support this synthetic activity are formed is of fundamental importance. The prevailing model poses that the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the sole gatekeeper for transit of cellular material in and out of the nucleus. However, insights from the nuclear assembly of large viral capsids highlig...
3 CitationsSource
#1James A. Ashley (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 16
#2Vivian Budnik (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 48
In this issue of Neuron, Newman et al. (2017) image calcium events at single synapses of unanesthetized Drosophila larvae. Synaptic plasticity and homeostatic regulation of synapses is established to be input specific. Furthermore, plasticity forms involve selective recruitment of previously active or silent synapses.
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#1Yihang Li (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 4
#2Linda Hassinger (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 1
Last.Vivian Budnik (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 48
view all 7 authors...
Summary Defective RNA metabolism and transport are implicated in aging and degeneration [1, 2], but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. A prevalent feature of aging is mitochondrial deterioration [3]. Here, we link a novel mechanism for RNA export through nuclear envelope (NE) budding [4, 5] that requires A-type lamin, an inner nuclear membrane-associated protein, to accelerated aging observed in Drosophila LaminC (LamC) mutations. These LamC mutations were modeled after A-lamin ...
11 CitationsSource
#1Lee G. Fradkin (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 3
#2Vivian Budnik (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 48
The nuclear envelope (NE) physically separates the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. While this barrier provides advantages, it also presents a challenge for the nuclear export of large ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. Decades-old dogma holds that all such border-crossing is via the nuclear pore complex (NPC). However, the diameter of the NPC central channel limits the passage of large cargos. Here, we review evidence that such large RNPs employ an endogenous NE-budding pathway, previously...
10 CitationsSource
#1Vivian BudnikH-Index: 48
Last.Franz WendlerH-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
Functional neural competence and integrity require interactive exchanges among sensory and motor neurons, interneurons and glial cells. Recent studies have attributed some of the tasks needed for these exchanges to extracellular vesicles (such as exosomes and microvesicles), which are most prominently involved in shuttling reciprocal signals between myelinating glia and neurons, thus promoting neuronal survival, the immune response mediated by microglia, and synapse assembly and plasticity. Such...
149 CitationsSource
#1Mary Packard (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 8
#2Vahbiz Jokhi (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 4
Last.Vivian Budnik (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 48
view all 6 authors...
Summary An important mechanism underlying synapse development and plasticity is the localization of mRNAs that travel from the nucleus to synaptic sites. Here we demonstrate that the giant nuclear-associated Nesprin1 (dNesp1) forms striated F-actin-based filaments, which we dubbed "railroad tracks," that span from muscle nuclei to postsynaptic sites at the neuromuscular junction in Drosophila . These railroad tracks specifically wrap around immature boutons formed during development and in respo...
15 CitationsSource
#1Kimberly S. Kerr (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 2
#2Yuly Fuentes-Medel (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 4
Last.Vivian Budnik (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 48
view all 10 authors...
Glial cells are emerging as important regulators of synapse formation, maturation, and plasticity through the release of secreted signaling molecules. Here we use chromatin immunoprecipitation along with Drosophila genomic tiling arrays to define potential targets of the glial transcription factor Reversed polarity (Repo). Unexpectedly, we identified wingless (wg), a secreted morphogen that regulates synaptic growth at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ), as a potential Repo targe...
47 CitationsSource
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