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Michael Mendl
University of Bristol
276Publications
44H-index
6,906Citations
Publications 276
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia1.62
James Hunt5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Megan Goff (UoB: University of Bristol)+ 6 AuthorsJoanna C. Murrell13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UoB: University of Bristol)
Abstract Objective To describe clinically relevant, physiological measurements collected during a 3 hour duration of alfaxalone total intravenous anaesthesia. Study design Case series. Animals A total of 112 client-owned middle-aged or older dogs. Methods Dogs were premedicated with intramuscular acepromazine (0.03 mg kg –1 ). Anaesthesia was induced and subsequently maintained for up to 3 hours with alfaxalone administered intravenously. Dogs breathed 100% oxygen via an endotracheal tube. Heart...
Published on Apr 18, 2019in bioRxiv
Vikki Neville1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Shinichi Nakagawa45
Estimated H-index: 45
(UNSW: University of New South Wales)
+ 5 AuthorsMichael Mendl44
Estimated H-index: 44
(UoB: University of Bristol)
Validated measures of animal affect are crucial to research spanning a number of disciplines including neuroscience, psychopharmacology, and animal welfare science. Judgement bias, which assesses decision-making under ambiguity, is a promising measure of animal affect. One way of validating this measure is to induce affective states using pharmacological manipulations and determine whether the predicted judgement biases are observed. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis using...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports4.01
Samantha Jones2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Vikki Neville1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UoB: University of Bristol)
+ 4 AuthorsMichael Mendl44
Estimated H-index: 44
(UoB: University of Bristol)
Scientific methods for assessing animal affect, especially affective valence (positivity or negativity), allow us to evaluate animal welfare and the effectiveness of 3Rs Refinements designed to improve wellbeing. Judgement bias tasks measure valence; however, task-training may be lengthy and/or require significant time from researchers. Here we develop an automated and self-initiated judgement bias task for rats which capitalises on their natural investigative behaviour. Rats insert their noses ...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports4.01
Samantha Jones2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Vikki Neville1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UoB: University of Bristol)
+ 4 AuthorsMichael Mendl44
Estimated H-index: 44
(UoB: University of Bristol)
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Pain6.03
James Hunt5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Megan Goff (UoB: University of Bristol)+ 7 AuthorsJoanna C. Murrell13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UoB: University of Bristol)
In man, central sensitisation (CS) contributes to the pain of osteoarthritis (OA). Dogs with spontaneous OA may also exhibit CS. Electrophysiological reflex measurements are more objective than behavioural assessments, and can be used to evaluate CS in preclinical and clinical studies. It was hypothesised that dogs suffering from OA would exhibit electrophysiological characteristics indicative of CS, associated with reduced diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC). 117 client owned dogs were r...
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Journal of Neuroscience Methods2.79
Oliver Burman16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Lincoln),
Michael Mendl44
Estimated H-index: 44
Abstract Background Assessing the affective state of animals is important for a range of research areas, including neuroscience. The use of cognitive judgement and attention biases to determine affective state has been demonstrated in animals, but approaches to assess mood-congruent biases in memory have yet to become established. New Method We describe a novel methodology to investigate memory bias in animals, presenting initial data using the influence of social status to manipulate affective ...
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Biology Letters3.32
Amanda Deakin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Michael Mendl44
Estimated H-index: 44
(UoB: University of Bristol)
+ 2 AuthorsJames J. L. Hodge9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UoB: University of Bristol)
Affective states influence decision-making under ambiguity in humans and other animals. Individuals in a negative state tend to interpret ambiguous cues more negatively than individuals in a positive state. We demonstrate that the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster , also exhibits state-dependent changes in cue interpretation. Drosophila were trained on a Go/Go task to approach a positive (P) odour associated with a sugar reward and actively avoid a negative (N) odour associated with shock. Trai...
Published on Feb 7, 2018
Poppy T E Statham6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Neill W. Campbell17
Estimated H-index: 17
+ 5 AuthorsMichael Mendl44
Estimated H-index: 44
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