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Simon J. Brandl
Simon Fraser University
Coral reef fishEcologyReefCoral reefBiology
36Publications
15H-index
517Citations
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Publications 40
Newest
#1R. A. Morais (JCU: James Cook University)H-Index: 6
#2Martial Depczynski (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 22
Last. David R. Bellwood (JCU: James Cook University)H-Index: 72
view all 8 authors...
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#1Simon J. Brandl (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 15
#2Jordan M. Casey (University of Perpignan)H-Index: 2
Last. Christopher P. Meyer (National Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 28
view all 3 authors...
Ecological niches hold critical information concerning the eco-evolutionary dynamics that govern biodiversity and abundance patterns. Cryptobenthic reef fishes account for approximately half of all reef fish species and are an abundant and important group on coral reefs worldwide. Yet, due to their small size and inconspicuous lifestyles, relatively little is known about the ecological niches of most cryptobenthic species. Here, we use gut content DNA metabarcoding to determine dietary niche ove...
1 CitationsSource
#1Simon J. Brandl (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 15
#2R. A. Morais (JCU: James Cook University)H-Index: 6
Last. David R. Bellwood (JCU: James Cook University)H-Index: 72
view all 10 authors...
Allgeier and Cline suggest that our model overestimates the contributions of cryptobenthic fishes to coral reef functioning. However, their 20-year model ignores the basic biological limits of population growth. If incorporated, cryptobenthic contributions to consumed fish biomass remain high (20 to 70%). Disturbance cycles and uncertainties surrounding the fate of large fishes on decadal scales further demonstrate the important role of cryptobenthic fishes.
1 CitationsSource
#1Lindsay M. Phenix (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 1
#2Dana TricaricoH-Index: 1
Last. Austin J. GallagherH-Index: 20
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The indirect effect of predators on prey behavior, recruitment, and spatial relationships continues to attract considerable attention. However, top predators like sharks or large, mobile teleosts, which can have substantial top-down effects in ecosystems, are often difficult to study due to their large size and mobility. This has created a knowledge gap in understanding how they affect their prey through nonconsumptive effects. Here, we investigated how different functional groups of predators a...
1 CitationsSource
#1Simon J. Brandl (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 15
#2Douglas B. Rasher (Bigelow Laboratory For Ocean Sciences)H-Index: 11
Last. J. Emmett Duffy (SERC: Smithsonian Environmental Research Center)H-Index: 54
view all 7 authors...
6 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan S. Lefcheck (SERC: Smithsonian Environmental Research Center)H-Index: 1
#2Simon J. Brandl (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 15
Last. Douglas B. Rasher (Bigelow Laboratory For Ocean Sciences)H-Index: 11
view all 6 authors...
Source
#1Simon J. Brandl (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 15
An assessment of coral communities on more than 2,500 reefs across the Indo-Pacific identifies three categories of reef according to their functionality and vulnerability to ocean warming. This categorization reveals a sobering picture of today’s coral reefs, but also provides a foundation for their future management.
Source
#1Jordan M. Casey (University of Perpignan)H-Index: 2
#2Christopher P. Meyer (National Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 28
Last. Valeriano Parravicini (University of Perpignan)H-Index: 26
view all 6 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Simon J. Brandl (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 15
#2Luke Tornabene (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 11
Last. David R. Bellwood (JCU: James Cook University)H-Index: 72
view all 10 authors...
How coral reefs survive as oases of life in low-productivity oceans has puzzled scientists for centuries. The answer may lie in internal nutrient cycling and/or input from the pelagic zone. Integrating meta-analysis, field data, and population modeling, we show that the ocean’s smallest vertebrates, cryptobenthic reef fishes, promote internal reef fish biomass production through extensive larval supply from the pelagic environment. Specifically, cryptobenthics account for two-thirds of reef fish...
7 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan S. Lefcheck (SERC: Smithsonian Environmental Research Center)H-Index: 17
#2Anne A. Innes-Gold (Vassar College)H-Index: 1
Last. Douglas B. Rasher (Bigelow Laboratory For Ocean Sciences)H-Index: 11
view all 6 authors...
There is now a general consensus that biodiversity positively affects ecosystem functioning. This consensus, however, stems largely from small-scale experiments, raising the question of whether diversity effects operate at multiple spatial scales and flow on to affect ecosystem structure in nature. Here, we quantified rates of fish herbivory on algal turf communities across multiple coral reefs spanning >1000 km of coastline in the Dominican Republic. We show that mass-standardized herbivory rat...
5 CitationsSource
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