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Bev Dahlby
University of Calgary
76Publications
18H-index
1,391Citations
Publications 76
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#1Bev Dahlby (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 18
#2Ergete FeredeH-Index: 2
This paper investigates the long-run effects of the corporate income tax (CIT) rate on the economic growth of Canadian provinces using annual panel data for the period 1981-2016. We find evidence of a statistically significant negative long-term relationship between the provincial statutory CIT rate and economic growth. The model has the properties of a neo-classical growth model in that a reduction in the CIT rate “temporarily” increases the growth rate of the economy before returning to its lo...
#1Bev Dahlby (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 18
The federal Fiscal Stabilization Program is meant to provide financial support for provinces that suffer extraordinary declines in revenues. However, the program only provided 248 million payment to Alberta in 2015-16 in the face of a .8 billion decline in revenues, and no support for Saskatchewan and Newfoundland and Labrador that have also suffered significant revenue reductions in recent years. We discuss the rationale for a Fiscal Stabilization Program, and three principles that should be...
#1Bev Dahlby (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 18
#2Braeden Larson (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 1
This paper provides background information that the public can use to assess the merits and consequences of introducing a land transfer tax in Alberta. Land transfer taxes are levied when real property is transferred from one owner to another. Five provincial governments levy land transfer taxes and in Ontario and British Columbia, they raise substantial amounts of revenue for the provincial governments. What is also clear is that land transfer taxes are very volatile sources of tax revenue that...
#1Philip Bazel (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 2
#2Daria Crisan (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 1
Last.Bev Dahlby (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 18
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William Lyon Mackenzie King, Canada’s 10th Prime Minister, used to say “Today’s promises are tomorrow’s taxes”. A more up-to-date version would be “Today’s deficits are tomorrow’s taxes.” Alberta’s governments began running deficits in 2008-09 and the NDP government only plans to balance the provincial budget in five years’ time. By then, Alberta’s public debt will have risen to about 90 billion with annual interest payments of .8 billion in 2023-24.1 Who will pay the taxes to pay the interes...
#1Bev Dahlby (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 18
The NDP government’s plan to balance the provincial budget by 2023-24 is based on drastically cutting capital spending and on optimistic revenue projections. In order to show that these are the key elements of the “Path to Balance”, we need to know how interest payments on debt, total operating expenditures, and the cash deficits will evolve under the government’s plan, but these key fiscal variables are not reported in the budget documents.
#1Bev Dahlby (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 18
Since the Notley government was elected in May 2015, total government expense has increased 14.3 per cent, well in excess of the growth of population and inflation - 8.9 per cent. Capital spending and grants have increased by a whopping 40 per cent, all of it financed by selling off financial assets and issuing new debt. Total debt servicing costs have increased from 776 million to .355 billion, an increase of $579 million - larger than the increase in the education budget and second only to ...
#1Bev Dahlby (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 18
#2Mukesh Khanal (U of C: University of Calgary)
The counterpart to the economic cycle is the policy cycle. Whenever there is a downturn in the Alberta economy because of slumping oil and gas prices, politicians of all persuasions, from Peter Lougheed to Rachel Notley, have called for policies to diversify the economy, on the assumption that expanding other sectors of the economy will insulate Alberta’s economy against volatile oil and gas prices. However, just because a sector is not directly part of the oil and gas extraction sector, does no...
We estimate tax base elasticities for Canadian provinces to compute the Marginal Cost of Public Funds (MCF) for the three major taxes and assess the revenue implications of tax rate changes. We find that generally the corporate income tax has the highest and the sales tax has the lowest MCF. We also find that four provinces were on the negatively sloped sections of their total revenue Laffer curves with respect to their corporate income tax rate in 2013. The policy implication of this is that th...
#1Bev Dahlby (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 18
#2Kevin Milligan (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 26
We survey Canadian economists contributions to the field of public finance from the mid-1980s to 2016. We highlight the development and extension of the models and tools of public economics and the empirical studies that have deepened our understanding of the efficiency and distributional issues over a wide range of public finance issues. We also highlight contributions to the development of policies through commissioned reports and the important role that Canadian institutionsthe Canadian Tax F...
#1Bev DahlbyH-Index: 18
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Lethbridge County introduced a new business tax on confined feeding operations (CFO), notably feedlots, in 2016. It was expected to bring in $2.5 million for county road maintenance in 2017. However, the tax could have a detrimental impact on feedlot owners and is not the fairest way to amass revenue for road repairs. Four criteria can be used to evaluate a particular form of taxation. They are fairness, efficient resource allocation, compliance and administration costs, and revenue stability. T...
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