Match!
Ian D. Boardley
University of Birmingham
PsychologyProsocial behaviorMoral disengagementApplied psychologySocial psychology
66Publications
18H-index
1,038Citations
What is this?
Publications 66
Newest
#1Ian D. BoardleyH-Index: 18
#2Alan L. SmithH-Index: 29
Last. Luke WilkinsH-Index: 4
view all 6 authors...
Source
#1Ian D. Boardley (University of Birmingham)H-Index: 18
#2Doris MatosicH-Index: 3
Last. Mark W. Bruner (Nipissing University)H-Index: 19
view all 3 authors...
Moral disengagement (MD) has been positively associated with antisocial behavior (AB) in sport. However, the longitudinal associations between MD and AB are unexamined to date. Adopting a three-wave cross-lagged panel design, the authors examined the reciprocal relations between MD and two forms of AB (i.e., toward opponents and teammates) across a competitive season with a sample of 407 team-sport athletes (Mage = 15.7 years) from Canada. Using structural equation modeling, the authors found st...
Source
#1Ian D. BoardleyH-Index: 18
#2Alan L. SmithH-Index: 29
Last. Luke WilkinsH-Index: 4
view all 6 authors...
Source
#1Ian D. BoardleyH-Index: 18
#2Alan L. SmithH-Index: 29
Last. Luke WilkinsH-Index: 4
view all 6 authors...
Source
#1Jordan D Herbison (Queen's University)H-Index: 2
#2Luc J. Martin (Queen's University)H-Index: 12
Last. Mark W. Bruner (Nipissing University)H-Index: 19
view all 10 authors...
Sport is a context in which youth are afforded the opportunity to develop meaningful connections with peers and adults (e.g., Holt, 2016). Based on recent evidence, the interactions that athletes have outside immediate training and competition environments can shape their overall sport experiences (Tamminen et al., 2017). Accordingly, researchers have been challenged to explore innovative approaches that can contribute rich data and subsequently inform a more comprehensive understanding of what ...
#1Justin M. Carré (Nipissing University)H-Index: 35
#2Shawn Geniole (UFV: University of the Fraser Valley)H-Index: 1
Last. Mark W. Bruner (Nipissing University)H-Index: 19
view all 11 authors...
Cortisol is a steroid hormone synthesized and secreted by the adrenal glands during experiences of physical and psycho-social stress. Cortisol levels have been found to rise sharply within the context of competitive interactions, yet with noticeable variability among athletes (Casto & Edwards, 2016). Here, we examined whether the degree to which one identifies with one's teammates (known as social identity) and competition outcome explain some of the variability in neuroendocrine reactivity patt...
#1Jordan Sutcliffe (Nipissing University)H-Index: 1
#2Jordan D Herbison (Queen's University)H-Index: 2
Last. Mark W. Bruner (Nipissing University)H-Index: 19
view all 11 authors...
As part of the physical youth sport environment, athletes are directly exposed to verbal and non-verbal feedback from important social agents, including parents (Fredricks & Eccles, 2005). It is important to note that athlete interactions with parents are not limited to public settings, and often occur in more private contexts such as at home or during transportation to and from sport. The car ride to and from competition represents a salient setting during which parents and athletes socialize a...
#1Colin McLaren (Nipissing University)H-Index: 1
#2Ian D. Boardley (University of Birmingham)H-Index: 18
Last. Mark W. Bruner (Nipissing University)H-Index: 19
view all 10 authors...
Relationships with significant others are important to the regulation of moral behaviour (e.g., Bandura, 1991). Using the social cognitive theory of moral thought and action as a foundation, the purpose of the current study was to test social identity strength as a mechanism through which teammate friendship networks at the individual and team levels relates to adaptive moral behavior in youth sport. Using social network analyses derived from reports of friendship strength among teammates, three...
#1Alex J. Benson (UWO: University of Western Ontario)H-Index: 10
#2Luc J. Martin (Queen's University)H-Index: 12
Last. Mark W. Bruner (Nipissing University)H-Index: 19
view all 10 authors...
The ways in which teammates interact with one another meaningfully shapes their sport experiences. In the current research, we leveraged an ambulatory ecological assessment tool known as the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR) to non-obtrusively document the acoustic nature of athletes' social environments. Guided by a social identity approach, we generated and tested the novel hypothesis that when athletes receive signals from teammates suggesting that they are a valued and accepted team me...
#1Mark W. Bruner (Nipissing University)H-Index: 19
#2Luc J. Martin (Queen's University)H-Index: 12
Last. Jean Côté (Queen's University)H-Index: 52
view all 11 authors...
During adolescence, youth increasingly interact with peers as their social realm expands beyond the family and they struggle to establish their identity (Wagner, 1996). Throughout this formative period, adolescents rely on the identities they form through memberships in different social groups (i.e., their social identities). Seminal research in social psychology notes that even with arbitrary grouping criteria (e.g., color preference), youth behaviours differ between group members (ingroup) and...
1234567