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Mark S. Poos
University of Toronto
13Publications
10H-index
423Citations
Publications 13
Newest
#1Mark S. Poos (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 10
#2Donald A. Jackson (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 42
Abstract Multivariate analyses are important tools for the biological assessment of ecological communities. Despite the popularity of multivariate analyses in bioassessments, there is considerable controversy over how to treat rare species. As this debate remains unresolved, the objective of this study was to develop a methodology to quantify the impacts of removing rare species relative to other decisions inherent in multivariate analyses and to provide insight into their relative influence in ...
#1Mark S. Poos (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 10
#2Donald A. Jackson (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 42
Species dispersal is a central component of metapopulation models. Spatially realistic metapopulation models, such as stochastic patch-occupancy models (SPOMs), quantify species dispersal using estimates of colonization potential based on inter-patch distance (distance decay model). In this study we compare the parameterization of SPOMs with dispersal and patch dynamics quantified directly from empirical data. For this purpose we monitored two metapopulations of an endangered minnow, redside dac...
#1Mark S. Poos (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 10
#2David LawrieH-Index: 2
Last.Nicholas E. Mandrak (Fisheries and Oceans Canada)H-Index: 29
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The Laurentian Great Lakes have undergone drastic declines in freshwater fishes, with 22 species having become extinct in the past century and many more currently at risk. One such species is the endangered minnow, the redside dace (Clinostomus elongatus), which is undergoing severe declines across its entire range. Depletion and mark–recapture surveys were used to quantify population estimates of redside dace at several spatial scales (pool, reach and catchment) across several Great Lakes tribu...
#1Astrid N. Schwalb (U of G: University of Guelph)H-Index: 11
#2Karl Cottenie (U of G: University of Guelph)H-Index: 27
Last.Josef Daniel Ackerman (U of G: University of Guelph)H-Index: 25
view all 4 authors...
Summary 1. Freshwater unionid mussels are a highly imperilled group. Their dispersal abilities depend on the availability and the movement of host fish on which their parasitic mussel larvae develop. 2. We examined the relationship between the dispersal abilities of unionid mussels and their conservation status on a regional (SW Ontario) scale and their distribution and abundance on a catchment scale (Sydenham River, SW Ontario) by determining host specificity and estimating the dispersal abilit...
#1Astrid N. Schwalb (U of G: University of Guelph)H-Index: 11
#2Mark S. Poos (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 10
Last.Josef Daniel Ackerman (U of G: University of Guelph)H-Index: 25
view all 3 authors...
Unionid mussels are highly imperiled and the survival of their local populations is linked to the availability and dispersal potential of their host fish. We examined the displacement distance of logperch (Percina caprodes), which are obligate host fish for endangered snuffbox mussels (Epioblasma triquetra), to determine the dispersal potential by fish. Logperch in the Sydenham River, Ontario, Canada, were electrofished and marked with visible implant elastomer on five sampling dates during the ...
#1Mark S. Poos (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 10
#2Alan J. Dextrase (Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources)H-Index: 4
Last.Josef Daniel Ackerman (U of G: University of Guelph)H-Index: 25
view all 4 authors...
The round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) first invaded North America in 1990 when it was discovered in the St. Clair River. Despite more than 15 years of potential invasion, many Great Lakes’ lotic systems remained uninvaded. Recently, we captured the round goby from several Great Lakes tributaries known as species-at-risk hotspots. With a combination of field sampling of round gobies and literature review of the impact of round gobies on native taxa, we assess the potential impacts of the second...
#1Mark S. Poos (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 10
#2Steven C. Walker (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 10
Last.Donald A. Jackson (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 42
view all 3 authors...
Functional diversity is an important concept in community ecology because it captures information on functional traits absent in measures of species diversity. One popular method of measuring functional diversity is the dendrogram-based method, FD. To calculate FD, a variety of methodological choices are required, and it has been debated about whether biological conclusions are sensitive to such choices. We studied the probability that conclusions regarding FD were sensitive, and that patterns i...
#1Mark S. Poos (U of G: University of Guelph)H-Index: 10
#2Nicholas E. MandrakN.E. Mandrak (U of G: University of Guelph)H-Index: 1
Last.Robert L. McLaughlin (U of G: University of Guelph)H-Index: 26
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Science-based approaches for selecting among single-species, community-, and ecosystem-based recovery plans are needed to conserve imperilled species. Selection of recovery plans has often been based on past success rates with other taxa and systems or on economic cost, but less on the ecology of the system in question. We developed a framework for selecting a recovery plan based on the distributions and ecology of imperilled and nonimperilled species across avail- able habitat types and applied...
#1Steven C. Walker (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 10
#2Mark S. PoosH-Index: 10
Last.Donald A. JacksonH-Index: 42
view all 3 authors...
Studies in biodiversity-ecosystem function and conservation biology have led to the development of diversity indices that take species' functional differences into account. We identify two broad classes of indices: those that monotonically increase with species richness (MSR indices) and those that weight the contribution of each species by abundance or occurrence (weighted indices). We argue that weighted indices are easier to estimate without bias but tend to ignore information provided by rar...
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