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Michael Winton
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
75Publications
32H-index
5,884Citations
Publications 75
Newest
#1Alistair Adcroft (Princeton University)H-Index: 26
#2W. Anderson (Princeton University)H-Index: 2
Last.Rong Zhang (Princeton University)H-Index: 27
view all 29 authors...
#1Mitchell Bushuk (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 6
#2Xiaosong Yang (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 14
Last.Rich Gudgel (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 7
view all 7 authors...
AbstractDynamical prediction systems have shown potential to meet the emerging need for seasonal forecasts of regional Arctic sea ice. Observationally constrained initial conditions are a key sourc...
#1D.B. Bonan (UW: University of Washington)
#2D. B. Bonan (UW: University of Washington)
Last.Michael Winton (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 32
view all 3 authors...
#1Mitchell Bushuk (GFDL: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory)H-Index: 6
#2Rym Msadek (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 20
Last.Rich Gudgel (GFDL: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory)H-Index: 7
view all 7 authors...
Seasonal predictions of Arctic sea ice on regional spatial scales are a pressing need for a broad group of stakeholders, however, most assessments of predictability and forecast skill to date have focused on pan-Arctic sea–ice extent (SIE). In this work, we present the first direct comparison of perfect model (PM) and operational (OP) seasonal prediction skill for regional Arctic SIE within a common dynamical prediction system. This assessment is based on two complementary suites of seasonal pre...
#1Ben Bronselaer (Princeton University)H-Index: 1
#2Michael Winton (GFDL: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory)H-Index: 32
Last.Joellen Russell (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 22
view all 8 authors...
Meltwater from the Antarctic Ice Sheet is projected to cause up to one metre of sea-level rise by 2100 under the highest greenhouse gas concentration trajectory (RCP8.5) considered by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). However, the effects of meltwater from the ice sheets and ice shelves of Antarctica are not included in the widely used CMIP5 climate models, which introduces bias into IPCC climate projections. Here we assess a large ensemble simulation of the CMIP5 model ‘GFDL...
#1Jie He (Princeton University)H-Index: 7
#2Benjamin Kirtman (UM: University of Miami)H-Index: 41
Last.Michael Winton (GFDL: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory)H-Index: 32
view all 6 authors...
#1Ming ZhaoH-Index: 3
#2Jean-Christophe Golaz (LLNL: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)H-Index: 29
Last.Baoqiang XiangH-Index: 16
view all 45 authors...
In Part II of this two-part paper, documentation is provided of key aspects of a version of the AM4.0/LM4.0 atmosphere/land model that will serve as a base for a new set of climate and Earth system models (CM4 and ESM4) under development at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL). The quality of the simulation in AMIP (Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project) mode has been provided in Part I. Part II provides documentation of key components and some sensitivities to choices of mode...
#1Benjamin Bronselaer (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 1
#2Michael Winton (GFDL: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory)H-Index: 32
Last.Samar Khatiwala (University of Oxford)H-Index: 4
view all 5 authors...
NSF's Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) under NSF [PLR-1425989]; NOAA; NASA
#1Benjamin Bronselaer (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 1
#2Michael Winton (GFDL: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory)H-Index: 32
Last.Samar Khatiwala (University of Oxford)H-Index: 4
view all 5 authors...
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