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Katja M. Heinemeier
University of Copenhagen
72Publications
24H-index
2,161Citations
Publications 72
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2019in European Journal of Applied Physiology3.06
Ching-Yan Chloé Yeung (UCPH: University of Copenhagen), Peter Schjerling52
Estimated H-index: 52
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
+ 3 AuthorsMichael Kjaer90
Estimated H-index: 90
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
Purpose The discovery of musculoskeletal tissues, including muscle, tendons, and cartilage, as peripheral circadian clocks strongly implicates their role in tissue-specific homeostasis. Age-related dampening and misalignment of the tendon circadian rhythm and its outputs may be responsible for the decline in tendon homeostasis. It is unknown which entrainment signals are responsible for the synchronization of the tendon clock to the light–dark cycle.
Published on Sep 1, 2018in The FASEB Journal5.39
Katja M. Heinemeier24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen),
Peter Schjerling52
Estimated H-index: 52
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
+ 3 AuthorsMichael Kjaer90
Estimated H-index: 90
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
Tendons are essential weight-bearing structures that are often affected by tendinopathy, which leads to pain and impaired mobility. In healthy Achilles tendons, no significant renewal of the weight-bearing collagen matrix seems to occur during adult life, but tendinopathy may lead to increased turnover. The carbon-14 ([14C]) bomb pulse method was used to measure lifelong replacement rates of collagen in tendinopathic and healthy Achilles tendons (tendinopathic: n = 25, born 1937–72. Healthy: n =...
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Journal of Biomechanics2.58
Antonis Giannopoulos1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen),
Rene B. Svensson13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
+ 5 AuthorsS. Peter Magnusson39
Estimated H-index: 39
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
Abstract Tendons transmit contractile muscular force to bone to produce movement, and it is believed cells can generate endogenous forces on the extracellular matrix to maintain tissue homeostasis. However, little is known about the direct mechanical measurement of cell-matrix interaction in cell-generated human tendon constructs. In this study we examined if cell-generated force could be detected and quantified in engineered human tendon constructs, and if glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) contribute t...
Published on Nov 1, 2017in Journal of Applied Physiology3.14
Katja M. Heinemeier24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen),
Tommy Frisgaard Øhlenschlæger2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
+ 4 AuthorsMichael Kjaer90
Estimated H-index: 90
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are widely used in the treatment of tendinopathy, but little is known of the effects of these drugs on tendon tissue. We find that 1 wk of ibuprofen treatment has no effect on gene expression of collagen and related growth factors in adult human tendinopathic tendon in vivo (in spite of relatively low levels of variation in gene expression), suggesting that tendinopathic cells are not responsive to ibuprofen.
Published on Aug 1, 2017in Journal of Applied Physiology3.14
Rie Nygaard8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Jacob Kildevang Jensen3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 8 AuthorsLars Remvig2
Estimated H-index: 2
This study is the first of its kind to systematically investigate muscle biopsies from Ehlers-Danlos patients, focusing on muscle structure and function. These patients suffer from severe muscle symptoms, but in our study they show surprisingly normal muscle findings, which points toward indirect muscle symptoms originating from the surrounding connective tissue. These findings have basal physiological importance and implications for future physiotherapeutic treatment options for these patients.
Published on Apr 1, 2017in The Journal of Rheumatology3.63
Adam El Mongy Jørgensen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen),
Michael Kjaer90
Estimated H-index: 90
,
Katja M. Heinemeier24
Estimated H-index: 24
Objective The morphology of articular cartilage (AC) enables painless movement. Aging and mechanical loading are believed to influence development of osteoarthritis (OA), yet the connection remains unclear. Methods This narrative review describes the current knowledge regarding this area, with the literature search made on PubMed using appropriate keywords regarding AC, age, and mechanical loading. Results Following skeletal maturation, chondrocyte numbers decline while increasing senescence occ...
Published on Mar 6, 2017in PLOS ONE2.78
Pernilla Eliasson17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Rene B. Svensson13
Estimated H-index: 13
+ 4 AuthorsKatja M. Heinemeier24
Estimated H-index: 24
Treatment with lipid-lowering drugs, statins, is common all over the world. Lately, the occurrence of spontaneous tendon ruptures or tendinosis have suggested a negative influence of statins upon t ...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Histochemistry and Cell Biology2.64
Christian Couppé17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen),
Rene B. Svensson13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
+ 6 AuthorsPeter Schjerling52
Estimated H-index: 52
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
Increased tendon cell nuclei density (TCND) has been proposed to induce tendon mechanical adaptations. However, it is unknown whether TCND is increased in tendon tissue after mechanical loading and whether such an increase can be quantified in a reliable manner. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable method for quantification of TCND and to investigate potential changes in TCND in rat Achilles tendons in response to 12 weeks of running. Eight adult male Sprague–Dawley rats ran (RUN) on ...
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Journal of Applied Physiology3.14
Rene B. Svensson13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen),
Katja M. Heinemeier24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
+ 2 AuthorsS. P. Magnusson42
Estimated H-index: 42
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
Here, we review the literature on how tendons respond and adapt to ageing and exercise. With respect to aging, there are considerable changes early in life, but this seems to be maturation rather than aging per se. In vitro data indicate that aging is associated with a decreased potential for cell proliferation and a reduction in the number of stem/progenitor-like cells. Further, there is persuasive evidence that turnover in the core of the tendon after maturity is very slow or absent. Tendon fi...
Published on Jul 6, 2016in Science Translational Medicine17.16
Katja M. Heinemeier24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen),
Peter Schjerling52
Estimated H-index: 52
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
+ 5 AuthorsMichael Kjaer90
Estimated H-index: 90
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
It has long been debated for many tissues in our bodies whether they are permanent or constantly refreshed as we go through life. Nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s and 1960s released a large amount of the carbon-14 isotope into the atmosphere, giving researchers the ability to determine the age and turnover of human tissues, ranging from the heart to the brain to, now, the cartilage. Heinemeier and colleagues used this so-called “14C bomb pulse” method to date cartilage from 23 individuals rangi...
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