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Kimberly A. Plomp
Simon Fraser University
AnatomyEburnationOsteoarthritisSchmorl's nodesBiology
11Publications
4H-index
47Citations
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Publications 14
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#1Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Keith Dobney (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 35
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
view all 3 authors...
Background and objectives: The study reported here focused on the aetiology of spondylolysis, a vertebral pathology usually caused by a fatigue fracture. The goal was to test the Overshoot Hypothesis, which proposes that people develop spondylolysis because their vertebral shape is at the highly derived end of the range of variation within Homo sapiens. Methodology: We recorded 3D data on the final lumbar vertebrae of H. sapiens and three great ape species, and performed three analyses. First, w...
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#1Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Keith Dobney (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 35
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
view all 5 authors...
Recently we proposed an evolutionary explanation for a spinal pathology that afflicts many people, intervertebral disc herniation (Plomp et al. [2015] BMC Evolutionary Biology 15, 68). Using 2D data, we found that the bodies and pedicles of lower vertebrae of pathological humans were more similar in shape to those of chimpanzees than were those of healthy humans. Based on this, we hypothesized that some individuals are more prone to intervertebral disc herniation because their vertebrae exhibit ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Una Strand Viðarsdóttir (University of Iceland)H-Index: 6
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
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Abstract A number of putative adaptations for bipedalism have been identified in the hominin spine. However, it is possible that some have been overlooked because only a few studies have used 3D and these studies have focused on cervical vertebrae. With this in mind, we used geometric morphometric techniques to compare the 3D shapes of three thoracic and two lumbar vertebrae of Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, and Pongo pygmaeus. The study had two goals. One was to confirm the exi...
1 CitationsSource
#1L. Timbrell (University of Cambridge)
#2Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
Abstract Variation in cranial morphology is routinely used in archaeology to identify population affinity in human skeletal remains. The shape of the external basicranial portion of the temporal bone, in particular, has been found to have one of the strongest phylogenetic signals in the crania, and so it can be effectively used to distinguish between populations on a large, often global scale. However, its applicability to the analysis of relatively closely-related groups remains largely unexplo...
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#1Kimberly A. PlompH-Index: 4
Last. Mark CollardH-Index: 33
view all 5 authors...
#1Mark CollardH-Index: 33
#2Kimberly A. PlompH-Index: 4
Last. Darlene A. WestonH-Index: 12
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#1Kimberly A. Plomp (University of Liverpool)H-Index: 4
Back pain is a major health issue in modern populations, with most people experiencing it at some point in their lives. Spinal lesions are also commonly identified in archaeological populations. However, the association of these lesions with clinical symptoms of pain and disability can be unclear. This chapter provides a brief summary of spinal pathologies commonly identified in bioarchaeological investigations and a discussion of their clinical significance in modern populations. The focus will...
1 CitationsSource
#1Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Anthea Boylston (University of Bradford)H-Index: 6
Abstract Osteoarthritis is one of the most frequently identified lesions in palaeopathological research. It has been extensively studied by both bioarchaeologists and medical researchers for decades, yet the aetiology of osteoarthritis remains unclear. One of the most important aspects of osteoarthritic studies is identifying the distribution patterns of the condition throughout the skeleton. Despite many studies reporting the occurrence of postcranial osteoarthritis, including in the spine, the...
1 CitationsSource
#1Kimberly A. Plomp (Durham University)H-Index: 4
#2Charlotte A. Roberts (Durham University)H-Index: 33
Last. U. Strand Viðarsdόttir (Durham University)H-Index: 1
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Osteoarthritis is a major health concern in living populations, as well as being one of the most common pathological lesions identified in the archaeological record. The aetiology of the disease remains unclear, with a multi-factorial influence of physical strain, age, genetics, and obesity. Previous studies have identified a relationship between the presence of knee osteoarthritis on the distal femoral joint and the morphology of the intercondylar notch, patellar groove, and medial condyle. The...
8 CitationsSource
#1Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Charlotte A. Roberts (Durham University)H-Index: 33
Last. Una Strand Vidarsdottir (University of Iceland)H-Index: 8
view all 3 authors...
Biomedical Center, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, IcelandKEY WORDS disc herniation; geometric morphometrics; shape analysis; palaeopathol-ogy; spinal healthABSTRACT Schmorl’s nodes are depressions on ver-tebrae due to herniation of the nucleus pulposus of theintervertebral disc into the vertebral body. This studyprovides an extension of our previous study which ana-lyzed the shape of the lower thoracic spine and foundthat vertebral morphology was associated with the pres-ence of Schmorl’s nod...
8 CitationsSource
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