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Sharon Bailin
Simon Fraser University
30Publications
7H-index
266Citations
Publications 30
Newest
#1Mark Battersby (Capilano University)H-Index: 4
#2Sharon Bailin (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 7
This volume reflects the development and theoretical foundation of a new paradigm for critical thinking based on inquiry. The field of critical thinking, as manifested in the Informal Logic movement, developed primarily as a response to the inadequacies of formalism to represent actual argumentative practice and to provide useful argumentative skills to students. Because of this, the primary focus of the field has been on informal arguments rather than formal reasoning. Yet the formalist history...
#1Sharon BailinH-Index: 7
#2Mark BattersbyH-Index: 4
Source
#1Sharon Bailin (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 7
#2Mark Battersby (Capilano University)H-Index: 4
This paper examines what constitute the virtues of argumentation or critical thinking and how these virtues might be developed. We argue first that the notion of virtue is more appropriate for characterizing this aspect than the notion of dispositions commonly employed by critical thinking theorists and, further, that it is more illuminating to speak of the virtues of inquiry rather than of argumentation. Our central argument is that learning to think critically is a matter of learning to partic...
Source
#1Sharon BailinH-Index: 7
#2Mark BattersbyH-Index: 4
13 Citations
#1Sharon BailinH-Index: 7
#2Mark BattersbyH-Index: 4
#1Sharon BailinH-Index: 7
#2Mark BattersbyH-Index: 4
This paper will describe and argue for an approach to foster critical thinking in higher education based on inquiry. This approach encompasses both critical thinking in everyday contexts and critical thinking within the disciplines.
1 CitationsSource
The dialectical approach to teaching critical thinking is centred on a comparative evaluation of contending arguments, so that generally the strength of an argument for a position can only be assessed in the context of this dialectic. The identification of fallacies, though important, plays only a preliminary role in the evaluation to individual arguments. Our approach to fallacy identification and analysis sees fallacies as argument patterns whose persuasive power is disproportionate to their p...
Source
#1Sharon Bailin (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 7
#2Mark BattersbyH-Index: 4
We argue in this paper that there is an epistemic obligation to communicate the appropriate degree of confidence when asserting conclusions in conductive argumentation. This runs contrary to the position of those theorists who contend that once the conclusion to a conductive argument is drawn, it is simply asserted in an unqualified manner. We argue, on the contrary, that, in many contexts, we do qualify our conclusions and further, that we have an epistemic responsibility to do so. As an illust...
3 CitationsSource
#1Mark BattersbyH-Index: 4
#2Sharon BailinH-Index: 7
We argue that psychological research can enhance the identification of reasoning errors and the development of an appropriate pedagogy to instruct people in how to avoid these errors. In this paper we identify some of the findings of psychologists that help explain some common fallacies, give examples of fallacies identified in the research that have not been typically identified in philosophy, and explore ways in which this research can enhance critical thinking instruction.
1 Citations
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