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Julia A. Schwartzman
University of Wisconsin-Madison
17Publications
11H-index
386Citations
Publications 18
Newest
#1Julia A. Schwartzman (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 11
#2Jonathan B. Lynch (U.H.: University of Hawaii at Manoa)H-Index: 2
Last.Edward G. Ruby (U.H.: University of Hawaii at Manoa)H-Index: 56
view all 7 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan B. Lynch (U.H.: University of Hawaii at Manoa)H-Index: 2
#2Julia A. Schwartzman (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 11
Last.Edward G. Ruby (U.H.: University of Hawaii at Manoa)H-Index: 56
view all 7 authors...
ABSTRACT Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are continuously produced by Gram-negative bacteria and are increasingly recognized as ubiquitous mediators of bacterial physiology. In particular, OMVs are powerful effectors in interorganismal interactions, driven largely by their molecular contents. These impacts have been studied extensively in bacterial pathogenesis but have not been well documented within the context of mutualism. Here, we examined the proteomic composition of OMVs from the marine ba...
Source
#2Sicai ZhangH-Index: 10
Last.Andrew C. DoxeyH-Index: 17
view all 13 authors...
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#1Sicai Zhang (Boston Children's Hospital)H-Index: 10
#2François Lebreton (Broad Institute)H-Index: 13
Last.Min Dong (Boston Children's Hospital)H-Index: 22
view all 13 authors...
Summary Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by various Clostridium strains, are a family of potent bacterial toxins and potential bioterrorism agents. Here we report that an Enterococcus faecium strain isolated from cow feces carries a BoNT-like toxin, designated BoNT/En. It cleaves both VAMP2 and SNAP-25, proteins that mediate synaptic vesicle exocytosis in neurons, at sites distinct from known BoNT cleavage sites on these two proteins. Comparative genomic analysis determines that the E. fa...
38 CitationsSource
#1José T. Saavedra (MEE: Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary)H-Index: 3
#2Julia A. Schwartzman (Broad Institute)H-Index: 11
Last.Michael S. Gilmore (Broad Institute)H-Index: 62
view all 3 authors...
Transposons can be used to easily generate and label the location of mutations throughout bacterial and other genomes. Transposon insertion mutants may be screened for a phenotype as individual isolates, or by selection applied to a pool of thousands of mutants. Identifying the location of a transposon insertion is critical for connecting phenotype to the genetic lesion. In this unit, we present an easy and detailed approach for mapping transposon insertion sites using arbitrarily-primed PCR (AP...
3 CitationsSource
Transposons can be used to easily generate and label the location of mutations throughout bacterial and other genomes. Transposon insertion mutants may be screened for a phenotype as individual isolates, or by selection applied to a pool of thousands of mutants. Identifying the location of a transposon insertion is critical for connecting phenotype to the genetic lesion. In this unit, we present an easy and detailed approach for mapping transposon insertion sites using arbitrarily-primed PCR (AP...
Source
Transposons can be used to easily generate and label the location of mutations throughout bacterial and other genomes. Transposon insertion mutants may be screened for a phenotype as individual isolates, or by selection applied to a pool of thousands of mutants. Identifying the location of a transposon insertion is critical for connecting phenotype to the genetic lesion. In this unit, we present an easy and detailed approach for mapping transposon insertion sites using arbitrarily-primed PCR (AP...
Source
#1Marie-Stéphanie Aschtgen (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 13
#2Jonathan B. Lynch (U.H.: University of Hawaii at Manoa)H-Index: 2
Last.Edward G. Ruby (U.H.: University of Hawaii at Manoa)H-Index: 56
view all 6 authors...
Using the squid-vibrio association, we aimed to characterize the mechanism through which Vibrio fischeri cells signal morphogenesis of the symbiotic light-emitting organ. The symbiont releases two cell envelope molecules, peptidoglycan (PG) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that, within 12 h of light organ colonization, act in synergy to trigger normal tissue development. Recent work has shown that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by V. fischeri are sufficient to induce PG-dependent morphogene...
19 CitationsSource
#1Julia A. Schwartzman (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 11
#2Edward G. Ruby (U.H.: University of Hawaii at Manoa)H-Index: 56
All multicellular hosts form associations with groups of microorganisms. These microbial communities can be taxonomically diverse and dynamic, and their persistence is due to robust, and sometimes coevolved, host–microbe and microbe–microbe interactions. Chemical and physical sources of stress are prominently situated in this molecular exchange, as cues for cellular responses in symbiotic microbes. Stress in the symbiotic environment may arise from three sources: host tissues, microbe-induced im...
19 CitationsSource
#1Julia A. Schwartzman (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 11
#2Edward G. Ruby (U.H.: University of Hawaii at Manoa)H-Index: 56
Abstract Microorganisms shape, and are shaped by, their environment. In host–microbe associations, this environment is defined by tissue chemistry, which reflects local and organism-wide physiology, as well as inflammatory status. We review how, in the squid–vibrio mutualism, both partners shape tissue chemistry, revealing common themes governing tissue homeostasis in animal–microbe associations.
16 CitationsSource
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