Match!
Bruce Tranter
University of Tasmania
SociologyPolitical sciencePublic administrationSocial sciencePolitics
187Publications
20H-index
1,251Citations
What is this?
Publications 190
Newest
#1Bruce Tranter (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 20
#2Jonathan F. Smith (ACU: Australian Catholic University)
Source
ABSTRACTReplicating questions on climate change and polar knowledge from the United States, this study examines the impact of climate related facts for predicting acceptance of anthropogenic climat...
Source
#1Bruce Tranter (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 20
#2Jonathan F. Smith (Monash University)H-Index: 5
ABSTRACTThe Australian Greens only formed as a national party in 1992. Here, some of the first young Australians able to inherit Greens party identity are examined. Analysis of youth cohort data fr...
Source
#1Bruce Tranter (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 20
#2Kate Booth (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 7
Abstract Trust is commonly understood as a mechanism that acts to improve transaction efficiency, or as a structural characteristic of organizations. It is a 'good' thing that can be built and harnessed for economic success. However, this type of conceptualisation maintains trust as a discrete and internally stable entity that is universally applied and cordoned off from socio-spatial complexities. In this paper, we present an empiric on trust in the insurance industry with an eye to reports on ...
Source
#1Adrian Franklin (UniSA: University of South Australia)H-Index: 17
Last. Katrina Jaworski (UniSA: University of South Australia)H-Index: 6
view all 6 authors...
Recent quantitative investigations consistently single out considerable gender variations in the experience of loneliness in Australia, and in particular how men are especially prone to protracted and serious episodes of loneliness. In 2017 the Director of Lifeline implicated loneliness as a significant factor in suicide among Australian men – currently three times the rate of suicide among women. Compared to women men also struggle to talk about loneliness or seek help from a range of informal ...
4 CitationsSource
#1Jed DonoghueH-Index: 7
#2Bruce TranterH-Index: 20
#1Jed DonoghueH-Index: 7
#2Bruce TranterH-Index: 20
#1Kate Booth (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 7
#2Bruce Tranter (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 20
In undertaking what we believe is the first national-scale study of its kind, we provide methodologically transparent, statistically robust insights into associations and potential unfolding effects of house and contents under-insurance. We identify new dimensions in the complex relationship between householders and insurance, including the salience of interpersonal – and likely institutional – trust. Under-insurance is (re)produced along socio-economic and geographical lines, with those of lowe...
6 CitationsSource
#1Bruce TranterH-Index: 20
#2Jed DonoghueH-Index: 7
National identity in Western nations has been claimed to be founded on the myths of a ‘golden age’, personified through heroes, saints or sages. If this is the case, contemporary citizens may be expected to identify historical and mythical characters as important national figures. Using national survey data from the United Kingdom and Australia, we asked who are the most important British or Australians, living or dead. By far the most frequently selected important British people were Queen Eliz...
#1Jed Donoghue (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 7
#2Bruce Tranter (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 20
This book explores the attitudes and values of Australians, analysing how Australian national values are promoted and reflected by heroic figures (both living and dead) who are identified as important and influential. Who are the ‘heroes, saints and sages’ that exemplify the Australian national character? Who do Australians, as citizens of a settler society, nominate as their contemporary heroes? What is the role of colonial and post-colonial figures regarding contemporary Australian identity? T...
12345678910