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Carol Bacchi
University of Adelaide
Gender studiesSociologyPolitical scienceSocial sciencePolitics
96Publications
26H-index
2,799Citations
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Publications 92
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This article scrutinizes critically a pervasive knowledge shaping contemporary sociopolitical relations and spaces—“problem-solving knowledge”. It develops the argument that, as a governing knowledge, “problem-solving” is increasing in intensity and scope, with a range of negative and potentially dangerous effects. As a case study, the article examines how problem-solving knowledge operates in the OECD “skills” assessment programs PISA and PIAAC, with a particularly worrying connection between s...
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#1Fran Baum (Flinders University)H-Index: 35
#2Adam Graycar (Flinders University)H-Index: 13
Last. Jane Fitzgerald (Flinders University)H-Index: 1
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1 CitationsSource
#1Carol BacchiH-Index: 26
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#1Carol Bacchi (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 26
This article puts in question the usefulness of the concept of “problem” or “problems” in alcohol and drug research and theory. A focus on problematizations is defended as a more effective political intervention. Particular attention is directed to the place of problematization as a mediating concept in understanding how practices constitute “objects” and “subjects,” a proposition commonly linked to “the ontological turn.” To access and analyze problematizations, the article puts forward a Fouca...
16 CitationsSource
#1Jennifer Bonham (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 8
#2Carol Bacchi (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 26
This article offers a poststructuralist analytic strategy that highlights the political nature of interview analysis. Interviews pose a particular challenge for poststructuralist researchers given ...
6 CitationsSource
ABSTRACTFor some time feminist scholars have been concerned with rethinking the constraints imposed on feminists’ strategies by categorical distinctions, such as the distinction between “women” and “men.” This issue has become more pressing due to a political commitment to recognize diversity among women and among men (consider here discussions of masculinities and intersectionality). This article offers the conceptualization of policies as gendering practices as a way to rethink categorical dis...
18 CitationsSource
#1Carol Bacchi (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 26
1. Carol Bacchi[1][1][⇑][2] 1. 1The University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia 1. Carol Bacchi, Politics Department, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia. Email: carol.bacchi{at}adelaide.edu.au This article directs attention to the significance, for health promotion advocates, of reflecting on how “problems” are constituted, or brought into existence, as particular sorts of problems, within policies and policy proposals. To this end, it introduces a poststruc...
28 CitationsSource
#1Carol BacchiH-Index: 26
In this article I engage with MAGEEQ methodology and theoretical assumptions to raise questions around the following themes: intentionality in political practice, meanings of discourse, and understandings of political subjectivity. I make the case that these topics need to be addressed in order to provide insights into the reasons social change is so difficult to achieve. Specifically, I suggest that feminists adopt a practice of «reflexive framing», examining how they represent social «problems...
6 CitationsSource
#1Carol Bacchi (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 26
#2Susan Goodwin (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 9
This chapter pursues a central task in the book, explaining what is accomplished by focusing on how policies produce or constitute “problems”. To begin, it canvasses how “problems” are conceptualized in classic rationalist, and in more recent interpretive and critical realist approaches to policy analysis, and indicates the possible deleterious implications of assuming the existence of problems as objective and uncontroversial states. Second, the chapter draws on WPR applications in two policy a...
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#1Carol Bacchi (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 26
#2Susan Goodwin (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 9
This chapter offers an analytic strategy, or “tool”, called “What’s the Problem Represented to be?” (the WPR approach), to facilitate poststructural policy analysis. It elaborates a poststructural understanding of politics as strategic relations and practices, and of theorizing as political practice. The WPR approach is introduced as a means to engage in such theorizing and to assist in the analytic task of making politics visible. To this end it offers seven interrelated forms of questioning an...
1 CitationsSource
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