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Thorsten Assmann
Lüneburg University
128Publications
25H-index
2,187Citations
Publications 130
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#1Marietta Hülsmann (Lüneburg University)H-Index: 2
#2Estève Boutaud (Lüneburg University)H-Index: 2
Last.Thorsten Assmann (Lüneburg University)H-Index: 25
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Abstract Ancient woodlands differ from recent woodlands by numerous abiotic and biotic factors, including soil properties. Several animal species are more abundant in ancient than in recent woodlands, but this has been only rarely tested for saprophagous taxa and not at all for dung beetles, which are common in temperate woodlands. Beside habitat continuity, tree age can have also an effect on woodland inhabiting animals, especially on saprophagous taxa. To analyze the effects of both habitat co...
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#1Estève BoutaudH-Index: 2
#2Dorothea NolteH-Index: 2
Last.Thorsten AssmannH-Index: 25
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#1Claudia DreesH-Index: 12
#2Estève BoutaudH-Index: 2
Last.Thorsten AssmannH-Index: 25
view all 7 authors...
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#1Claudia DreesH-Index: 12
#2Wiebke SchuettH-Index: 13
Last.Thorsten AssmannH-Index: 25
view all 4 authors...
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#1Marietta Hülsmann (Lüneburg University)H-Index: 2
#2Estève Boutaud (Lüneburg University)H-Index: 2
Last.Thorsten Assmann (Lüneburg University)H-Index: 25
view all 5 authors...
In woodlands, land use legacy, but also present habitat management can influence biodiversity and ecosystem functions in various ways. However, little is known about how former and current land use interact in woodlands with different habitat continuity and tree age. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of both habitat continuity and tree age on ground beetles. We performed a field study in the nature reserve “Luneburger Heide” (Germany). The study area comprised ancient woodland ...
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#1Thorsten AssmannH-Index: 25
#2Estève BoutaudH-Index: 2
Last.Pascale ZumsteinH-Index: 3
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#1Thorsten AssmannH-Index: 25
#2Estève BoutaudH-Index: 2
Last.Pascale ZumsteinH-Index: 3
view all 4 authors...
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#1Ingmar Harry (Lüneburg University)H-Index: 3
#2Hubert Höfer (State Museum of Natural History Karlsruhe)H-Index: 13
Last.Thorsten Assmann (Lüneburg University)H-Index: 25
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1 CitationsSource
#1Dorothea Nolte (Lüneburg University)H-Index: 2
#2Estève Boutaud (Lüneburg University)H-Index: 2
Last.Thorsten Assmann (Lüneburg University)H-Index: 25
view all 5 authors...
The worldwide biodiversity crisis is ongoing. To slow down, or even halt future species loss it is important to identify potential drivers of extinction risk. Species traits can help to understand the underlying process of extinction risk. In a comprehensive study on 464 carabid beetle species, we used ordinal logistic regression to analyze the relationship of species traits to extinction risk in Central Europe, taking phylogenetic relatedness into account. To consider varying trait responses in...
2 CitationsSource
#1Katharina Homburg (Lüneburg University)H-Index: 5
#2Claudia Drees (UHH: University of Hamburg)H-Index: 12
Last.Thorsten Assmann (Lüneburg University)H-Index: 25
view all 8 authors...
1. The drastic insect decline has received increasing attention in scientific as well as in public media. Long-term studies of insect diversity trends are still rare, even though such studies are highly important to assess extent, drivers and potential consequences of insect loss in ecosystems. 2. To gain insights into carabid diversity trends of ancient and sustainably managed woodlands, we analysed data of carabid beetles from a trapping study that has been run for 24 years in an old nature re...
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