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W. de Vente
University of Amsterdam
24Publications
9H-index
499Citations
Publications 24
Newest
#1Mirjana Majdandzic (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 12
#2Rebecca S. Lazarus (Macquarie University)H-Index: 2
Last.Susan M. Bögels (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 53
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Challenging parenting behavior (CPB), a novel construct involving active physical and verbal behaviors that encourage children to push their limits, has been identified as a potential buffer against child anxiety. This study aimed to (a) evaluate the measurement invariance of the Challenging Parenting Behavior Questionnaire (CPBQ4-6) across Dutch and Australian mothers and fathers of preschoolers, (b) examine differences in levels of CPB across mothers and fathers and across countries, and (c) e...
2 CitationsSource
#1J.E. van der Zwan (VU: VU University Amsterdam)H-Index: 1
#2W. de Vente (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 9
Last.E. I. de Bruin (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 1
view all 5 authors...
Source
#1Milica NikolićH-Index: 5
#2Cristina ColonnesiH-Index: 12
Last.Susan M. BögelsH-Index: 53
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Blushing has adaptive social functions. However, blushing is also assumed to be a hallmark of social anxiety and shyness. For the first time, blushing and its relation to the expressions of shyness and social anxiety was examined in early childhood. Four-and-a-half-year-old children (N = 102) were asked to perform (singing in front of an audience) and watched back their performance in the presence of that audience. Physiological blushing (blood volume pulse, blood volume, and cheek temperature) ...
9 CitationsSource
#1Milica Nikolić (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 5
#2Cristina Colonnesi (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 12
Last.Susan M. Bögels (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 53
view all 5 authors...
Blushing was recently introduced in the DSM-5 as a “hallmark” physiological response of social anxiety disorder, and it is now acknowledged as an important aspect of social anxiety. Three meta-analyses were performed to examine the association between blushing and social anxiety. The relationship between blushing and social anxiety was strong for self-perceived blushing, small for physiological blushing, and medium for observed blushing. In addition, the relationship between self-perceived blush...
5 CitationsSource
#1W. de VenteH-Index: 9
#2J.E. van der ZwanH-Index: 1
Last.Anja C. HuizinkH-Index: 40
view all 3 authors...
#1W. de Vente (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 9
#2Mirjana Majdandzic (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 12
Last.Susan M. Bögels (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 53
view all 5 authors...
Abstract We developed a new version of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI) in order to have a brief instrument for measuring social anxiety and social anxiety disorder (SAD) with a strong conceptual foundation. In the construction phase, a set of items representing 5 core aspects of social anxiety was selected by a panel of social anxiety experts. The selected item pool was validated using factor analysis, reliability analysis, and diagnostic analysis in a sample of healthy participan...
11 CitationsSource
#1W. de VenteH-Index: 9
#2Mirjana MajdandzicH-Index: 12
Last.Susan M. BögelsH-Index: 53
view all 3 authors...
In this chapter, current knowledge about the pathophysiology of social anxiety is reviewed. Physiological studies reveal that social anxiety and its antecendent, a fearful temperament, are characterized by basal hyperarousal and enhanced reactivity to social stressors, suggesting a lower threshold of the limbic system. The blushing response appears enhanced in social anxiety disorder (SAD) compared to no anxiety disorder, although its specificity for SAD versus other anxiety disorders is unknown...
2 CitationsSource
#1J.E. van der ZwanH-Index: 1
#2W. de VenteH-Index: 9
Last.E. I. de BruinH-Index: 1
view all 5 authors...
1 Citations
#1Eline L. Möller (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 8
#2Mirjana Majdandzic (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 12
Last.Susan M. Bögels (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 53
view all 4 authors...
In this review, we discuss the evolutionary basis of differences in paternal and maternal parenting behavior in Western societies and apply this to the intergenerational transmission of anxiety. The different specializations that males and females developed during the course of human evolution (e.g., social competition, risk taking, taking chances for males, and care, nurturing, intimate bonding for females), are expected to be reflected in their parenting behavior, which evidence confirms. Rese...
34 CitationsSource
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