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Mark Collard
Simon Fraser University
PaleontologyArchaeologyPhylogenetic treeGeographyBiology
146Publications
33H-index
3,538Citations
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Publications 150
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#2Mark CollardH-Index: 33
Last. Dennis SandgatheH-Index: 17
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#1W. Christopher Carleton (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 3
#2Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
ABSTRACTWe report a study in which we systematically reviewed the recent literature dealing with human-environment interaction in prehistory. We first identified the 165 most highly cited papers pu...
4 CitationsSource
#1Luseadra McKerracher (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Pablo A. Nepomnaschy (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 9
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
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Variation in the durations of exclusive breastfeeding (exBF) and any breastfeeding (anyBF) is associated with socioecological factors. This plasticity in breastfeeding behavior appears adaptive, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. With this concept in mind, we investigated whether durations of exBF and anyBF in a rural Maya population covary with markers of a form of socioecological change—market integration—and whether individual factors (individual learning, physiological plasticity) and/...
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#1Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Keith Dobney (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 35
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
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Background and objectives: The study reported here focused on the aetiology of spondylolysis, a vertebral pathology usually caused by a fatigue fracture. The goal was to test the Overshoot Hypothesis, which proposes that people develop spondylolysis because their vertebral shape is at the highly derived end of the range of variation within Homo sapiens. Methodology: We recorded 3D data on the final lumbar vertebrae of H. sapiens and three great ape species, and performed three analyses. First, w...
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#1Briggs BuchananH-Index: 22
#2Mark CollardH-Index: 33
Last. Michael J. O'BrienH-Index: 69
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#1Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Keith Dobney (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 35
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
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Recently we proposed an evolutionary explanation for a spinal pathology that afflicts many people, intervertebral disc herniation (Plomp et al. [2015] BMC Evolutionary Biology 15, 68). Using 2D data, we found that the bodies and pedicles of lower vertebrae of pathological humans were more similar in shape to those of chimpanzees than were those of healthy humans. Based on this, we hypothesized that some individuals are more prone to intervertebral disc herniation because their vertebrae exhibit ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Una Strand Viðarsdóttir (University of Iceland)H-Index: 6
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
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Abstract A number of putative adaptations for bipedalism have been identified in the hominin spine. However, it is possible that some have been overlooked because only a few studies have used 3D and these studies have focused on cervical vertebrae. With this in mind, we used geometric morphometric techniques to compare the 3D shapes of three thoracic and two lumbar vertebrae of Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, and Pongo pygmaeus. The study had two goals. One was to confirm the exi...
1 CitationsSource
#1Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
#2Sally Wasef (Griffith University)H-Index: 3
Last. Michael C. Westaway (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 10
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ABSTRACTIn this paper we outline a worked example of the combined use of genetic data and archaeological evidence. The project focuses on Queensland’s Cape York Peninsula and has two goals. One is ...
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#1Mana DemboH-Index: 5
Last. Mark CollardH-Index: 33
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#1Shaun Adams (Griffith University)H-Index: 1
#2Rainer Grün (Griffith University)H-Index: 54
Last. Michael C. Westaway (Griffith University)H-Index: 10
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It has been estimated that up to 25% of Indigenous human remains held in Australian institutions are unprovenanced. Geochemical tracers like strontium isotope ratios ( Sr/ Sr) have been used globally for over 40 years to discern human provenance and provide independent data to aid in repatriation efforts. To reliably apply this technology, landscape Sr/ Sr isotope ratio variability must be quantified. In Australia, only a few studies have used this technique and they are lacking in detail. Here,...
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