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Paul T. Harding
29Publications
8H-index
1,069Citations
Publications 29
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2014
David B. Roy59
Estimated H-index: 59
,
Paul T. Harding8
Estimated H-index: 8
+ 1 AuthorsHelen E. Roy34
Estimated H-index: 34
Published on Oct 5, 2012in European Journal of Entomology
Bethan V. Purse22
Estimated H-index: 22
,
Steve J. Gregory1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsHelen E. Roy34
Estimated H-index: 34
Despite the importance of saprophagous macroarthropods as key facilitators of plant litter decomposition within ecosystems and their likely sensitivity to global climate change and land-use change, a lack of ecological data has precluded attempts to explain their distribution patterns in terms of traits. Using an extensive set of large-scale and long-term biological records, the distribution patterns of 33 woodlice (Crustacea: Oniscidea) species in Britain were characterised by their range size ...
Published on Jan 1, 2006
P. Lee1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Paul T. Harding8
Estimated H-index: 8
Published on Jan 1, 2005
D. Proctor , Paul T. Harding8
Estimated H-index: 8
Invertebrate specialists from across Europe met in Cardiff 5-9 September 2003 to discuss conservation action for marine, freshwater and terrestrial invertebrates under the title of Red Lists for Invertebrates. Three consecutive meetings looked at different aspects of this vast topic. The Bern Group of Experts on Conservation of Invertebrates, the European Invertebrate Survey and the IUCN European Invertebrate Specialists Group each held business meetings. Most delegates also attended a one day c...
Published on Jan 1, 2003
Richard Fox33
Estimated H-index: 33
,
Martin Warren27
Estimated H-index: 27
+ 3 AuthorsStephen Jeffcoate1
Estimated H-index: 1
Butterflies for the new millennium: mapping butterfly distributions in Britain (Lepidoptera) Butterflies for the New Millennium is the largest and most comprehensive survey of butterfly distribution ever undertaken in Britain and Ireland. The number of contributing recorders, the coverage achieved and the number and quality of distribution records generated far exceed those available for any other invertebrate taxon. The data thus provide a unique insight into the effects of habitat degradation ...
Published on Nov 1, 2001in Nature43.07
Martin Warren27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Butterfly Conservation),
Jane K. Hill54
Estimated H-index: 54
(Ebor: University of York)
+ 12 AuthorsPaul T. Harding8
Estimated H-index: 8
Habitat degradation and climate change are thought to be altering the distributions and abundances of animals and plants throughout the world, but their combined impacts have not been assessed for any species assemblage1,2,3,4. Here we evaluated changes in the distribution sizes and abundances of 46 species of butterflies that approach their northern climatic range margins in Britain—where changes in climate and habitat are opposing forces. These insects might be expected to have responded posit...
Richard Fox33
Estimated H-index: 33
,
Martin Warren27
Estimated H-index: 27
+ 3 AuthorsPaul T. Harding8
Estimated H-index: 8
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