Match!
Louise McRae
Zoological Society of London
47Publications
15H-index
3,807Citations
Publications 47
Newest
#1Elizabeth J. Green (World Conservation Monitoring Centre)H-Index: 1
#2Louise McRae (ZSL: Zoological Society of London)H-Index: 15
Last.William D. Simonson (World Conservation Monitoring Centre)
view all 7 authors...
Source
#1Elisa Bayraktarov (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 7
#2Glenn Ehmke (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 7
Last.David B. Lindenmayer (ANU: Australian National University)H-Index: 98
view all 8 authors...
Conserving species biodiversity demands decisive and effective action. Effective action requires an understanding of species population dynamics. Therefore, robust measures which track temporal changes in species populations are needed. This need, however, must be balanced against the scale at which population change is being assessed. Advances in citizen science and remote sensing technology have heralded an era of "big unstructured data" for biodiversity conservation. However, the value of big...
4 CitationsSource
#1Anwesha Saha (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 2
#2Louise McRae (ZSL: Zoological Society of London)H-Index: 15
Last.Monika Böhm (ZSL: Zoological Society of London)H-Index: 18
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Effective conservation action relies on access to the best-available species data. Reptiles have often been overlooked in conservation prioritization, especially because of a paucity of population data. Using data for 549 reptile populations representing 194 species from the Living Planet database, we provide the first detailed analysis of this database for a specific taxonomic group. We estimated an average global decline in reptile populations of 54–55% between 1970 and 2012. Disaggre...
5 CitationsSource
#1Jonas Geldmann (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 15
#2Lauren Coad (CIFOR: Center for International Forestry Research)H-Index: 2
Last.Neil D. Burgess (World Conservation Monitoring Centre)H-Index: 57
view all 12 authors...
Protecting important sites is a key strategy for halting the loss of biodiversity. However, our understanding of the relationship between management inputs and biodiversity outcomes in protected areas (PAs) remains weak. Here, we examine biodiversity outcomes using species population trends in PAs derived from the Living Planet Database in relation to management data derived from the Management Effectiveness Tracking Tool (METT) database for 217 population time-series from 73 PAs. We found a pos...
15 CitationsSource
#1W. Daniel Kissling (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 29
#2Jorge A. Ahumada (CI: Conservation International)H-Index: 22
Last.Alex Hardisty (Cardiff University)H-Index: 13
view all 36 authors...
Much biodiversity data is collected worldwide, but it remains challenging to assemble the scattered knowledge for assessing biodiversity status and trends. The concept of Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) was introduced to structure biodiversity monitoring globally, and to harmonize and standardize biodiversity data from disparate sources to capture a minimum set of critical variables required to study, report and manage biodiversity change. Here, we assess the challenges of a ‘Big Data’ a...
58 CitationsSource
#1Vânia Proença (IST: Instituto Superior Técnico)H-Index: 14
#2Laura J. Martin (Harvard University)H-Index: 11
Last.Chris van Swaay (Butterfly Conservation)H-Index: 23
view all 16 authors...
Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) consolidate information from varied biodiversity observation sources. Here we demonstrate the links between data sources, EBVs and indicators and discuss how different sources of biodiversity observations can be harnessed to inform EBVs. We classify sources of primary observations into four types: extensive and intensive monitoring schemes, ecological field studies and satellite remote sensing. We characterize their geographic, taxonomic and temporal cover...
66 CitationsSource
#1P .J. Stephenson (IUCN: International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources)H-Index: 3
#2Thomas M. Brooks (IUCN: International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources)H-Index: 57
Last.Louise McRae (ZSL: Zoological Society of London)H-Index: 15
view all 10 authors...
8 CitationsSource
#1Louise McRaeH-Index: 15
#2Robin FreemanH-Index: 22
Last.C. HailsH-Index: 2
view all 4 authors...
2 Citations
#1Louise McRae (ZSL: Zoological Society of London)H-Index: 15
#2Stefanie Deinet (ZSL: Zoological Society of London)H-Index: 5
Last.Robin Freeman (ZSL: Zoological Society of London)H-Index: 22
view all 3 authors...
As threats to species continue to increase, precise and unbiased measures of the impact these pressures are having on global biodiversity are urgently needed. Some existing indicators of the status and trends of biodiversity largely rely on publicly available data from the scientific and grey literature, and are therefore prone to biases introduced through over-representation of well-studied groups and regions in monitoring schemes. This can give misleading estimates of biodiversity trends. Here...
28 CitationsSource
#1W. Daniel KisslingH-Index: 29
#2Jorge A. AhumadaH-Index: 22
Last.Alex HardistyH-Index: 13
view all 36 authors...
Much biodiversity data is collected worldwide, but it remains challenging to assemble the scattered knowledge forassessing biodiversity status and trends. The concept of Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) was introduced tostructure biodiversity monitoring globally, and to harmonize and standardize biodiversity data from disparate sourcesto capture a minimum set of critical variables required to study, report and manage biodiversity change. Here, weassess the challenges of a ‘Big Data’ appro...
51 CitationsSource
12345