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Jolie B. Wormwood
University of New Hampshire
23Publications
5H-index
127Citations
Publications 24
Newest
#1Aya Khalaf (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 4
#2Mohsen Nabian (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 4
Last.Sarah Ostadabbas (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 10
view all 11 authors...
Abstract Challenge and threat characterize distinct patterns of physiological response to a motivated performance task where the response patterns vary as a function of an individual's evaluation of task demands relative to his/her available resources to cope with the demands. Challenge and threat responses during motivated performance have been used to understand psychological, behavioral, and biological phenomena across many motivated performance domains. In this study, we aimed to investigate...
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#1Jolie B. Wormwood (UNH: University of New Hampshire)H-Index: 5
#2Zulqarnain Khan (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 1
Last.Karen S. Quigley (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 28
view all 7 authors...
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#1Joseph Fridman (NU: Northeastern University)
#2Lisa Feldman Barrett L F (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 138
Last.Karen S. Quigley (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 28
view all 4 authors...
Law enforcement personnel commonly make decisions in stressful circumstances, where the costs associated with errors are high and sometimes fatal. In this paper we apply a powerful theoretical approach, the theory of constructed emotion (TCE), to understanding decision-making under evocative circumstances. This theory posits that the primary purpose of a brain is to predictively regulate physiological resources to coordinate the body’s motor activity and learning in the short-term, and to meet t...
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#1Donovan C Kelley (UNH: University of New Hampshire)
#2Erika H. Siegel (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 8
Last.Jolie B. Wormwood (UNH: University of New Hampshire)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
We examine when and how police officers may avoid costly errors under stress by leveraging theoretical and empirical work on the biopsychosocial (BPS) model of challenge and threat. According to the BPS model, in motivated performance contexts (e.g., test taking, athletics), the evaluation of situational and task demands in relation to one’s perceived resources available to cope with those demands engenders distinct patterns of peripheral physiological responding. Individuals experience more cha...
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#1Jolie B. Wormwood (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 5
#2Erika H. Siegel (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 8
Last.Lisa Feldman Barrett L F (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 138
view all 5 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Jolie B. Wormwood (UNH: University of New Hampshire)H-Index: 5
#2Yu-Ru Lin (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 25
Last.Karen S. Quigley (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 28
view all 5 authors...
Exposure to media coverage of mass violence has been shown to predict poorer mental health symptomology. However, it is unknown whether such media coverage can have ubiquitous effects on average community members, extending to biological and perceptual processes that underlie everyday decision making and behavior. Here, we used a repeated-measures design over the first anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings to track participants’ self-reported distress, their eye blink startle reactivity wh...
1 CitationsSource
#1Eric Anderson (Maine Medical Center)H-Index: 10
#2Jolie B. Wormwood (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 5
Last.Karen S. Quigley (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 28
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Many vegetarians report that meat is unpleasant, but little else is known about their affective responses to meat and non-meat foods. Here we explored affective responses to food images in vegetarians and omnivores and tested the hypothesis that vegetarians have global differences in affective processing (e.g., increased disgust sensitivity). We presented pictures of different food items and recorded participants’ affective experience while we recorded peripheral physiology. We found th...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ian R. Kleckner (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 9
#2Eric Anderson (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 10
Last.Lisa Feldman Barrett L F (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 138
view all 6 authors...
Abstract A growing body of research claims that stimuli presented outside conscious awareness can influence affect, speech perception, decision-making, eating behavior, and social judgments. However, research has shown that conscious awareness is a continuous phenomenon. Using a continuous flash suppression (CFS) paradigm to suppress awareness of affective faces (smiling and scowling), we demonstrate that some awareness of suppressed stimuli is required for the stimuli to influence social judgme...
3 CitationsSource
#1Jolie B. Wormwood (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 5
#2Madeleine Devlin (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 1
Last.Karen S. Quigley (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 28
view all 5 authors...
Media exposure influences mental health symptomology in response to salient aversive events, like terrorist attacks, but little has been done to explore the impact of news coverage that varies more subtly in affective content. Here, we utilized an existing data set in which participants self-reported physical symptoms, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms, and completed a potentiated startle task assessing their physiological reactivity to aversive stimuli at three time points (waves) over ...
3 CitationsSource
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