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Meike A. Schweisfurth
Max Planck Society
PsychologySomatosensory systemProsthesisSensory systemPhysical medicine and rehabilitation
15Publications
6H-index
104Citations
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Publications 16
Newest
#1Marko Markovic (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 11
#2Marc Varel (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 1
Last. Strahinja Dosen (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 21
view all 5 authors...
In the case of a hand amputation, the affected person can use a myoelectric prosthesis to substitute the missing limb and regain motor functions. Unfortunately, commercial methods for myoelectric control, although robust and simple, are unintuitive and cognitively taxing when applied to an advanced multifunctional prosthesis. The state-of-the-art methods developed in academia are based on machine learning and therefore require long training and suffer from a lack of robustness. This work present...
1 CitationsSource
#1Meike A. Schweisfurth (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 6
#2Jens Frahm (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 81
Last. Renate Schweizer (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 13
view all 4 authors...
The tactile digit representations in the primary somatosensory cortex have so far been mapped for either the left or the right hand. This study localized all ten digit representations in right-handed subjects and compared them within and across the left and right hands to assess potential differences in the functional organization of the digit map between hands and in the structural organization between hemispheres. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of tactile stimulation of each fingertip i...
1 CitationsSource
#1Marko Markovic (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 11
#2Meike A. Schweisfurth (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 6
Last. Strahinja Dosen (AAU: Aalborg University)H-Index: 21
view all 5 authors...
Background Sensory feedback is critical for grasping in able-bodied subjects. Consequently, closing the loop in upper-limb prosthetics by providing artificial sensory feedback to the amputee is expected to improve the prosthesis utility. Nevertheless, even though amputees rate the prospect of sensory feedback high, its benefits in daily life are still very much debated. We argue that in order to measure the potential functional benefit of artificial sensory feedback, the baseline open-loop perfo...
3 CitationsSource
#1A. M. De Nunzio (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 1
#2Meike A. Schweisfurth (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 6
Last. Dario Farina (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 76
view all 14 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Janne M. Hahne (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 9
#2Meike A. Schweisfurth (Hamburg University of Applied Sciences)H-Index: 6
Last. Dario Farina (Imperial College London)H-Index: 76
view all 4 authors...
Myoelectric hand prostheses are usually controlled with two bipolar electrodes located on the flexor and extensor muscles of the residual limb. With clinically established techniques, only one function can be controlled at a time. This is cumbersome and limits the benefit of additional functions offered by modern prostheses. Extensive research has been conducted on more advanced control techniques, but the clinical impact has been limited, mainly due to the lack of reliability in real-world cond...
11 CitationsSource
#1Marko Markovic (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 11
#2Meike A. Schweisfurth (Hamburg University of Applied Sciences)H-Index: 6
Last. Strahinja DosenH-Index: 21
view all 7 authors...
Background To effectively replace the human hand, a prosthesis should seamlessly respond to user intentions but also convey sensory information back to the user. Restoration of sensory feedback is rated highly by the prosthesis users, and feedback is critical for grasping in able-bodied subjects. Nonetheless, the benefits of feedback in prosthetics are still debated. The lack of consensus is likely due to the complex nature of sensory feedback during prosthesis control, so that its effectiveness...
10 CitationsSource
#2Jennifer ErnstH-Index: 2
Last. Gunther FelmererH-Index: 2
view all 7 authors...
Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) represents a breakthrough interface for prosthetic control in high-level upper-limb amputees. However, clinically, it is still limited to the direct motion-wise control restricted by the number of reinnervation sites. Pattern recognition may overcome this limitation. Previous studies on EMG classification in TMR patients experienced with myocontrol have shown greater accuracy when using high-density (HD) recordings compared to conventional single-channel deriv...
Source
#1Alessandro Marco De Nunzio (University of Birmingham)H-Index: 14
#2Strahinja Dosen (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 21
Last. Dario Farina (Royal School of Mines)H-Index: 76
view all 9 authors...
Grasping is a complex task routinely performed in an anticipatory (feedforward) manner, where sensory feedback is responsible for learning and updating the internal model of grasp dynamics. This study aims at evaluating whether providing a proportional tactile force feedback during the myoelectric control of a prosthesis facilitates learning a stable internal model of the prosthesis force control. Ten able-bodied subjects controlled a sensorized myoelectric prosthesis performing four blocks of c...
11 CitationsSource
#1Meike A. Schweisfurth (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 6
#2Tashina Bentz (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 1
Last. Dario Farina (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 76
view all 8 authors...
We explored the performance of a glenohumeral TMR (targeted muscle reinnervation) patient in controlling the activity of two reinnervated muscles of the chest and back during a compensatory tracking task that implied quick switches of activity between the two muscles. The same task was conducted in intact-bodied subjects, using either the wrist flexor/extensor muscles (innervated by the nerves were used as donors in the TMR patient) or the chest/back muscles that were re-innervated in the patien...
Source
#1Marko Markovic (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 11
#2Leonard F. Engels (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 2
Last. Dario Farina (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 76
view all 6 authors...
In an attempt to investigate the value of artificial somatosensory feedback in upper limb prostheses we designed a novel, modular feedback system and paired it with a battery of clinically-relevant tests. Three transhumeral amputee subjects, wearing dexterous myoelectric hands, participated in the study. The obtained objective as well as subjective performance outcomes indicate that the benefits of feedback might be seen only in dexterous, delicate tasks.
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