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Phillip Barden
New Jersey Institute of Technology
CretaceousPaleontologyHymenopteraBiologyZoology
26Publications
9H-index
241Citations
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Publications 29
Newest
#1Solomon T C Chak (NJIT: New Jersey Institute of Technology)
#2Phillip Barden (NJIT: New Jersey Institute of Technology)H-Index: 9
Last. J. Antonio Baeza (Clemson University)H-Index: 18
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In the marine realm, eusociality is only known to have evolved within a clade of sponge-dwelling snapping shrimps in the genus Synalpheus. Deciphering the genomic underpinnings of eusociality in these marine shrimps has been limited by the sparse genomic resources in this genus. Here, we report, for a eusocial shrimp Synalpheus microneptunus, a complete mitochondrial genome (22X coverage) assembled from short Illumina 150 bp paired-end reads. The 15,603 bp long mitochondrial genome of S. microne...
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#1Phillip Barden (NJIT: New Jersey Institute of Technology)H-Index: 9
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#1Vincent Perrichot (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 21
#2Bo Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 37
Last. Phillip Barden (NJIT: New Jersey Institute of Technology)H-Index: 9
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Abstract Haidomyrmecines (hell ants) are a group of putatively predatory ants defined by mandibles that are dorsoventrally expanded, and highly modified heads with a variety of cranial appendages. These ants are known exclusively from three Cretaceous amber deposits in France, Myanmar, and Canada. Here we describe four new genera and five new species from specimens preserved in mid-Cretaceous (uppermost Albian–lowermost Cenomanian, ca. 99 Ma) amber from the Kachin State of northern Myanmar: Dhag...
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#1Phillip BardenH-Index: 9
#2Michael S. EngelH-Index: 37
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#1Ninon Robin (NJIT: New Jersey Institute of Technology)
#2Cyrille A. D’Haese (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 18
Last. Phillip Barden (NJIT: New Jersey Institute of Technology)H-Index: 9
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Dispersal is essential for terrestrial organisms living in disjunct habitats and constitutes a significant challenge for the evolution of wingless taxa. Springtails (Collembola), the sister-group of all insects (with Diplura), are reported since the Lower Devonian and are thought to have originally been subterranean. The order Symphypleona is reported since the early Cretaceous with genera distributed on every continent. This distribution implies an ability to disperse over oceans, however symph...
1 CitationsSource
#1David A. GrimaldiH-Index: 41
#2David SunderlinH-Index: 5
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#1David A. Grimaldi (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 41
#2Georgene A. Aaroe (Lafayette College)
Last. Christopher J. Williams (F&M: Franklin & Marshall College)H-Index: 23
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The Chickaloon Formation in south-central Alaska contains rich coal deposits dated very close to the Paleocene-Eocene boundary, immediately beneath which occur dispersed nodules of amber along with abundant remains of Metasequoia, dicots, and monocots. The nodules are small (less than 10 mm in length), nearly 10,000 of which were screened, yielding several inclusions of fungi and plant fragments, but mostly terrestrial arthropods: 29 specimens in 10 orders and 13 families. The fungi include resi...
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#1Julian Katzke (University of Bonn)
#2Phillip Barden (NJIT: New Jersey Institute of Technology)H-Index: 9
Last. Torsten Wappler (University of Bonn)H-Index: 20
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Shape is a natural phenomenon inherent to many different lifeforms. A modern technique to analyse shape is geometric morphometrics (GM), which offers a whole range of methods concerning the pure shape of an object. The results from these methods have provided new insights into biological problems and have become especially useful in the fields of entomology and palaeontology. Despite the conspicuous successes in other hymenopteran groups, GM analysis of wings and fossil wings of Formicidae has b...
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1 CitationsSource
#1Phillip Barden (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 9
#2Brendon E. Boudinot (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 6
Last. Andrea Lucky (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 11
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The distinctive ant genus Leptomyrmex Mayr, 1862 had been thought to be endemic to Australasia for over 150 years, but enigmatic Neotropical fossils have challenged this view for decades. The present study responds to a recent and surprising discovery of extant Leptomyrmex species in Brazil with a thorough evaluation of the Dominican Republic fossil material, which dates to the Miocene. In the first case study of direct fossil inclusion within Formicidae Latreille, 1809, we incorporated both liv...
2 CitationsSource
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