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Dirk Zeller
University of Western Australia
Fisheries managementGeographyFisheryFishingBiology
226Publications
41H-index
9,388Citations
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#1Ussif Rashid Sumaila (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 40
#2Dirk Zeller (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 41
Last. Daniel Pauly (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 93
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Illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing is widespread; it is therefore likely that illicit trade in marine fish catch is also common worldwide. We combine ecological-economic databases to estimate the magnitude of illicit trade in marine fish catch and its impacts on people. Globally, between 8 and 14 million metric tons of unreported catches are potentially traded illicitly yearly, suggesting gross revenues of US9 to US7 billion associated with these catches. Estimated loss in annual ec...
1 CitationsSource
#1Gabriel M. S. Vianna (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 9
Last. Dirk ZellerH-Index: 41
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Small-scale fishing has been an important element of the livelihood and food security in Pacific Island countries throughout history; however, such catches have been under-reported in the official fisheries data. Here, we reconstruct the total domestic catches and fishing effort of the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) by fishing sectors for 1950-2017. Reconstructed total catches were estimated to be 27% higher than the data officially reported by the Food and Agriculture Organization of th...
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Commercial fisheries catches by countries are documented since 1950 by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Unfortunately, this does not hold for marine recreational catches, of which only few, if any, estimates are reported to FAO. We reconstructed preliminary estimates of likely marine recreational catches for 1950—2014, based on independent reconstructions for 125 countries. Our estimates of marine recreational catches that are retained and landed increased globally until the early-19...
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#1Angie Coulter (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 1
#2Tim Cashion (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 4
Last. Daniel Pauly (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 93
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Abstract Despite worldwide demand for tuna products and considerable conservation interest by civil society, no single global dataset exists capturing the spatial extent of all catches from fisheries for large pelagic species across all ocean basins. Efforts to spatially quantify the historical catch of global tuna fisheries have been restricted to the few taxa of major economic interest, creating a truncated view of the true extent of the fisheries for tuna and other large pelagic fishes. Indiv...
1 CitationsSource
#2Dirk ZellerH-Index: 41
Last. John N. KittingerH-Index: 27
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#1Krista Greer (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 4
#2Dirk Zeller (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 41
Last. Daniel Pauly (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 93
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Abstract There are currently two separate approaches for estimating global CO2 emissions from marine fishing. One approach uses catch-based fuel use intensity (FUI) estimates for well-studied areas/fisheries to estimate FUI in data poor regions. The second approach, effort-based FUI, uses reconstructed fishing effort data to estimate fuel use based on vessel size and fishing times. Both methods utilize assumptions which are inherently uncertain; the advantages and disadvantages of each method ar...
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#1Krista GreerH-Index: 4
#2Dirk Zeller (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 41
Last. Daniel PaulyH-Index: 93
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Abstract Using the Sea Around Us global catch and effort databases ( www.seaaroundus.org ), this study presents time series estimates (1950–2016) of total CO2 emissions and emissions intensity (CO2 emissions per unit of catch) from the combustion of fuel in global marine fisheries by fishing sector, as well as a regional comparison of fuel use intensity for 2011. In 2016, total CO2 emissions of the industrial fishing sector were 159 million tonnes compared to 39 million tonnes in 1950. In contra...
3 CitationsSource
#1Steven W. J. Canty (MMU: Manchester Metropolitan University)H-Index: 2
#2Manuela Funes (CONICET: National Scientific and Technical Research Council)H-Index: 2
Last. Dirk Zeller (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 41
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Declining fisheries catches are a global trend, with management failing to keep pace with growth in fishing effort and technological advances. The economic value of Honduras’ catches was estimated within the industrial and artisanal sectors. Catches were found to be 2.9 times greater than the official statistics between 1950 and 2015. The merging of industrial and artisanal catch data masked the decline in industrial catches and hid the strong growth of artisanal fisheries. In 1996, annual artis...
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