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Elena R. Schroeter
North Carolina State University
13Publications
8H-index
163Citations
Publications 13
Newest
Elena R. Schroeter8
Estimated H-index: 8
(NCSU: North Carolina State University),
Kevin Blackburn11
Estimated H-index: 11
(NCSU: North Carolina State University)
+ -3 AuthorsMary H. Schweitzer24
Estimated H-index: 24
(NCSU: North Carolina State University)
Humic substances are breakdown products of decaying organic matter that co-extract with proteins from fossils. These substances are difficult to separate from proteins in solution and interfere wit...
Published on Jul 4, 2019in Proteomics3.11
Mary H. Schweitzer24
Estimated H-index: 24
,
Elena R. Schroeter8
Estimated H-index: 8
+ 1 AuthorsWenxia Zheng10
Estimated H-index: 10
Yanhong Pan13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Wenxia Zheng10
Estimated H-index: 10
(NCSU: North Carolina State University)
+ 13 AuthorsJingmai K. O’Connor9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Dinosaur fossils possessing integumentary appendages of various morphologies, interpreted as feathers, have greatly enhanced our understanding of the evolutionary link between birds and dinosaurs, as well as the origins of feathers and avian flight. In extant birds, the unique expression and amino acid composition of proteins in mature feathers have been shown to determine their biomechanical properties, such as hardness, resilience, and plasticity. Here, we provide molecular and ultrastructural...
Published on Jan 31, 2018in Journal of Proteome Research3.78
Timothy P. Cleland11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Museum Conservation Institute),
Elena R. Schroeter8
Estimated H-index: 8
(NCSU: North Carolina State University)
The last two decades have seen a broad diversity of methods used to identify and/or characterize proteins in the archeological and paleontological record. Of these, mass spectrometry has opened an unprecedented window into the proteomes of the past, providing protein sequence data from long extinct animals as well as historical and prehistorical artifacts. Thus, application of mass spectrometry to fossil remains has become an attractive source for ancient molecular sequences with which to conduc...
Published on Feb 3, 2017in Journal of Proteome Research3.78
Elena R. Schroeter8
Estimated H-index: 8
(NCSU: North Carolina State University),
Caroline Jane DeHart8
Estimated H-index: 8
+ 5 AuthorsMary H. Schweitzer24
Estimated H-index: 24
(NCSU: North Carolina State University)
Sequence data from biomolecules such as DNA and proteins, which provide critical information for evolutionary studies, have been assumed to be forever outside the reach of dinosaur paleontology. Proteins, which are predicted to have greater longevity than DNA, have been recovered from two nonavian dinosaurs, but these results remain controversial. For proteomic data derived from extinct Mesozoic organisms to reach their greatest potential for investigating questions of phylogeny and paleobiology...
Yanhong Pan13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Wenxia Zheng10
Estimated H-index: 10
(NCSU: North Carolina State University)
+ 7 AuthorsMary H. Schweitzer24
Estimated H-index: 24
(NCSU: North Carolina State University)
Abstract Microbodies associated with feathers of both nonavian dinosaurs and early birds were first identified as bacteria but have been reinterpreted as melanosomes. Whereas melanosomes in modern feathers are always surrounded by and embedded in keratin, melanosomes embedded in keratin in fossils has not been demonstrated. Here we provide multiple independent molecular analyses of both microbodies and the associated matrix recovered from feathers of a new specimen of the basal bird Eoconfuciuso...
Published on Oct 27, 2016in PeerJ2.35
Elena R. Schroeter8
Estimated H-index: 8
(NCSU: North Carolina State University),
Caroline Jane DeHart8
Estimated H-index: 8
(NU: Northwestern University)
+ 2 AuthorsNeil L. Kelleher71
Estimated H-index: 71
(NU: Northwestern University)
Proteomic studies of bone require specialized extraction protocols to demineralize and solubilize proteins from within the bone matrix. Although various protocols exist for bone protein recovery, little is known about how discrete steps in each protocol affect the subset of the bone proteome recovered by mass spectrometry (MS) analyses. Characterizing these different “extractomes” will provide critical data for development of novel and more efficient protein extraction methodologies for fossils....
Published on Jun 15, 2016
Timothy P. Cleland11
Estimated H-index: 11
(RPI: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute),
Elena R. Schroeter8
Estimated H-index: 8
(NCSU: North Carolina State University)
+ 1 AuthorsDeepak Vashishth36
Estimated H-index: 36
(RPI: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute)
Vertebrate fossils have been collected for hundreds of years and are stored in museum collections around the world. These remains provide a readily available resource to search for preserved proteins; however, the vast majority of palaeoproteomic studies have focused on relatively recently collected bones with a well-known handling history. Here, we characterize proteins from the nasal turbinates of the first Castoroides ohioensis skull ever discovered. Collected in 1845, this is the oldest muse...
Published on Jan 30, 2016in Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry2.04
Elena R. Schroeter8
Estimated H-index: 8
(NCSU: North Carolina State University),
Timothy P. Cleland11
Estimated H-index: 11
(RPI: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute)
Rationale Much credence has been given in the paleoproteomic community to glutamine deamidation as a proxy for the age of proteins derived from fossil and subfossil material, and this modification has been invoked as a means for determining the endogeneity of molecules recovered from very old fossil specimens. Methods We re-evaluated the relationship between glutamine deamidation and geologic time by examining previously published data from five recent mass spectrometry studies of archeaological...
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