Match!
Edze R. Westra
University of Exeter
CRISPR LociGeneticsBiologyImmune systemCRISPR
57Publications
23H-index
5,052Citations
What is this?
Publications 67
Newest
#1Jack CommonH-Index: 2
Last. Edze R. WestraH-Index: 23
view all 4 authors...
Source
#1Jake L. Weissman (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 2
#2Arlin Stoltzfus (NIST: National Institute of Standards and Technology)H-Index: 21
Last. Philip L. F. Johnson (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 41
view all 4 authors...
The battle between microbes and their viruses is ancient and ongoing. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) immunity, the first and, to date, only form of adaptive immunity found in prokaryotes, represents a flexible mechanism to recall past infections while also adapting to a changing pathogenic environment. Critical to the role of CRISPR as an adaptive immune mechanism is its capacity for self versus non-self recognition when acquiring novel immune memories. Yet, CR...
Source
#1Edze R. Westra (University of Exeter)H-Index: 23
Source
#1Clare Rollie (University of Exeter)H-Index: 1
#2Anne Chevallereau (University of Exeter)H-Index: 5
Last. Edze R. Westra (University of Exeter)H-Index: 23
view all 10 authors...
Source
#1Anne Chevallereau (University of Exeter)H-Index: 5
#2Sean Meaden (University of Exeter)H-Index: 8
Last. Edze R. Westra (University of Exeter)H-Index: 23
view all 9 authors...
Summary Bacteriophages encoding anti-CRISPR proteins (Acrs) must cooperate to overcome phage resistance mediated by the bacterial immune system CRISPR-Cas, where the first phage blocks CRISPR-Cas immunity in order to allow a second Acr phage to successfully replicate. However, in nature, bacteria are frequently not pre-immunized, and phage populations are often not clonal, exhibiting variations in Acr presence and strength. We explored how interactions between Acr phages and initially sensitive ...
7 CitationsSource
#1Edze R. Westra (University of Exeter)H-Index: 23
#2Bruce R. Levin (Emory University)H-Index: 21
Last. Bruce R. Levin (Emory University)H-Index: 48
view all 2 authors...
Articles on CRISPR commonly open with some variant of the phrase these short-palindromic repeats and their associated endonucleases (Cas) are an adaptive immune system that exists to protect bacteria and archaea from viruses and infections with other deleterious (badass) DNAs. There is an abundance of genomic data consistent with the hypothesis that CRISPR plays this role in natural populations of bacteria and archaea, and experimental demonstrations with a few species of bacteria and their phag...
Source
#1Anne ChevallereauH-Index: 5
#2Clare RollieH-Index: 1
Last. Edze R. WestraH-Index: 23
view all 10 authors...
On infection of their host, temperate viruses that infect bacteria (bacteriophages; hereafter referred to as phages) enter either a lytic or a lysogenic cycle. The former results in lysis of bacterial cells and phage release (resulting in horizontal transmission), whereas lysogeny is characterized by the integration of the phage into the host genome, and dormancy (resulting in vertical transmission)1. Previous co-culture experiments using bacteria and mutants of temperate phages that are locked ...
5 CitationsSource
#1Jenny M. Broniewski (University of Exeter)H-Index: 5
#2Sean Meaden (University of Exeter)H-Index: 8
Last. Edze R. Westra (University of Exeter)H-Index: 23
view all 5 authors...
CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune systems are found in bacteria and archaea and provide defence against phage by inserting phage-derived sequences into CRISPR loci on the host genome to provide sequence specific immunological memory against re-infection. Under laboratory conditions the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa readily evolves the high levels of CRISPR-based immunity against clonal populations of its phage DMS3vir, which in turn causes rapid extinction of the phage. However, in nature phage popu...
3 CitationsSource
#1Sean Meaden (University of Exeter)H-Index: 8
#2Loris Capria (University of Exeter)
Last. Edze R. Westra (University of Exeter)H-Index: 23
view all 8 authors...
Phages play a major role in shaping the composition, evolution and function of bacterial communities. While bacteria and phages coexist in many natural environments, their coexistence is often short-lived in the lab due to the evolution of phage resistance. However, fitness costs associated with resistance and mutational loss of resistance alleles may limit the durability of acquired resistances, potentially allowing phages to re-invade the population. Here, we explore this idea in the context o...
Source
#1Bridget N.J. Watson (University of Exeter)H-Index: 4
#2Reuben B. Vercoe (University of Otago)H-Index: 2
Last. Peter C. Fineran (University of Otago)H-Index: 35
view all 6 authors...
Type I CRISPR-Cas systems are abundant and widespread adaptive immune systems in bacteria and can greatly enhance bacterial survival in the face of phage infection. Upon phage infection, some CRISPR-Cas immune responses result in bacterial dormancy or slowed growth, which suggests the outcomes for infected cells may vary between systems. Here we demonstrate that type I CRISPR immunity of Pectobacterium atrosepticum leads to suppression of two unrelated virulent phages, ɸTE and ɸM1. Immunity resu...
4 CitationsSource
1234567