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Laura C. Greaves
Newcastle University
62Publications
24H-index
2,481Citations
Publications 63
Newest
Alterations in mitochondrial metabolism have been described as one of the major hallmarks of both ageing cells and cancer. Age is the biggest risk factor for the development of a significant number of cancer types and this therefore raises the question of whether there is a link between age-related mitochondrial dysfunction and the advantageous changes in mitochondrial metabolism prevalent in cancer cells. A common underlying feature of both ageing and cancer cells is the presence of somatic mut...
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#1Hannah L. Paish (Newcastle University)H-Index: 2
#2Lee H. Reed (Newcastle University)H-Index: 1
Last.Fiona Oakley (Newcastle University)H-Index: 33
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4 CitationsSource
#1Fiona C. Malcomson (Newcastle University)H-Index: 3
#2S.P. Breininger (Newcastle University)
Last.John C. Mathers (Newcastle University)H-Index: 65
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Background:Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide. Age is the strongest non-modifiable risk factor but it is estimated that over half of CRC cases are linked with lifesty...
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#2Fiona C. MalcomsonH-Index: 3
Last.John C. MathersH-Index: 65
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Last.Mark WalkerH-Index: 82
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Introduction: Age-related cumulative mitochondrial mutations can cause mitochondrial dysfunction. The mitochondrial DNA mutator mouse (PolgA mut/mut ) is a model of premature ageing and has been previously shown to develop impaired insulin secretion with age. Methods: Immunofluorescence was used to study mitochondrial respiratory chain protein expression (complex I and IV) and the cell composition in islets. Experiments were conducted on pancreas tissue from PolgA mut/mut mice and age-matched wi...
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#1Ashwin SachdevaH-Index: 8
#2Claire A HartH-Index: 21
Last.Noel W. ClarkeH-Index: 53
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#1Rhys Anderson (Newcastle University)H-Index: 7
#2Anthony Lagnado (Newcastle University)H-Index: 3
Last.João F. Passos (Newcastle University)H-Index: 29
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Abstract Ageing is the biggest risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Cellular senescence, a process driven in part by telomere shortening, has been implicated in age‐related tissue dysfunction. Here, we address the question of how senescence is induced in rarely dividing/post‐mitotic cardiomyocytes and investigate whether clearance of senescent cells attenuates age‐related cardiac dysfunction. During ageing, human and murine cardiomyocytes acquire a senescent‐like phenotype characterised by pe...
16 CitationsSource
#1Tianhong Su (Newcastle University)H-Index: 2
#2John P. Grady (Newcastle University)H-Index: 6
Last.Laura C. Greaves (Newcastle University)H-Index: 24
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Wellcome Trust. Grant Number: G096919 MRC ESRC EPSRC BBSRC Newcastle University Centre for Ageing and Vitality
4 CitationsSource
#1Rhys Anderson (Newcastle University)H-Index: 7
#2Anthony Lagnado (Newcastle University)H-Index: 3
Last.João F. Passos (Newcastle University)H-Index: 29
view all 34 authors...
Ageing is the biggest risk factor for cardiovascular health and is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. Cellular senescence, a process driven in part by telomere shortening, has been implicated in age-related tissue dysfunction. Here, we address the question of how senescence is induced in rarely dividing/post-mitotic cardiomyocytes and investigate if clearance of senescent cells attenuates age related cardiac dysfunction. During ageing, human and murine cardiomyocytes ...
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#1Marie-Lune Simard (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 5
#2Arnaud Mourier (University of Bordeaux)H-Index: 21
Last.James B. Stewart (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 25
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2 CitationsSource
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