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Rebecca S. Barak
Michigan State University
BiodiversityEcologyRestoration ecologyBiologyPhylogenetic diversity
11Publications
5H-index
120Citations
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Publications 11
Newest
#1Alicia J. Foxx (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 1
#2Rebecca S. Barak (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 5
Last. Evelyn W. WilliamsH-Index: 5
view all 6 authors...
Efforts to increase inclusion in science face multiple barriers, including cultural and social behaviors in settings such as academic conferences. Conferences are beneficial, but the culture can promote inequities and power differentials that harm historically underrepresented groups. Science suffers when conference culture propagates exclusion and discrimination that leads to attrition of scientists. Codes of conduct represent a tool to shift conference culture to better support diverse scienti...
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#1Evelyn W. WilliamsH-Index: 5
#2Rebecca S. BarakH-Index: 5
Last. Daniel J. Larkin (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 14
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Attempting to control invasive plant species in tallgrass prairie restorations is time-consuming and costly, making improved approaches for predicting and reducing invasion imperative. Both biotic and abiotic factors mediate plant invasions, and can potentially be used by restoration managers to reduce invasion rates. Biotic factors such as plant species richness and phylogenetic diversity of the native community may impact invasion. Relatedness of invading species to those in recipient...
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#1Rebecca S. Barak (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 5
#2Taran M. Lichtenberger (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 1
Last. Daniel J. Larkin (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 14
view all 5 authors...
3 CitationsSource
#1Andrew L. Hipp (Morton Arboretum)H-Index: 28
#2Mary-Claire Glasenhardt (Morton Arboretum)H-Index: 1
Last. Daniel J. Larkin (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 14
view all 13 authors...
Our understanding of the effects of plant biodiversity on ecosystem function rests in large part on experiments that have disentangled environmental variables from local diversity. Yet phylogenetic diversity (PD) effects can be confounded by phylogenetic identity effects in such experiments if assemblages with low or high PD tend to be dominated by a single clade. We illustrate this problem in a 127-species experiment designed to test the effects of angiosperm PD and trait diversity on tallgrass...
2 CitationsSource
#1Rebecca S. Barak (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 5
#2Evelyn W. WilliamsH-Index: 5
Last. Daniel J. Larkin (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 14
view all 7 authors...
Summary Ecological restoration is critical for mitigating habitat loss and providing ecosystem services. However, restorations often have lower diversity than remnant, reference sites. Phylogenetic diversity is an important component of biodiversity and ecosystem function that has only recently been used to evaluate restoration outcomes. To move towards prediction in the restoration of biodiversity, it is necessary to understand how phylogenetic diversity of restorations compares with that of re...
16 CitationsSource
#1Lars A. Brudvig (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 24
#2Rebecca S. Barak (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 5
Last. Chad R. Zirbel (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 5
view all 10 authors...
Summary Ecological restoration is a global priority that holds great potential for benefiting natural ecosystems, but restoration outcomes are notoriously unpredictable. Resolving this unpredictability represents a major, but critical challenge to the science of restoration ecology. In an effort to move restoration ecology toward a more predictive science, we consider the key issue of variability. Typically, restoration outcomes vary relative to goals (i.e. reference or desired future conditions...
41 CitationsSource
#1Rebecca S. BarakH-Index: 5
#2Evelyn W. WilliamsH-Index: 5
Last. Daniel J. LarkinH-Index: 14
view all 7 authors...
#1Rebecca S. Barak (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 5
#2Andrew L. Hipp (Morton Arboretum)H-Index: 28
Last. Daniel J. LarkinH-Index: 14
view all 9 authors...
Historical information spanning different temporal scales (from tens to millions of years) can influence restoration practice by providing ecological context for better understanding of contemporary ecosystems. Ecological history provides clues about the assembly, structure, and dynamic nature of ecosystems, and this information can improve forecasting of how restored systems will respond to changes in climate, disturbance regimes, and other factors. History recorded by humans can be used to gen...
14 CitationsSource
#1Jessica L. Riebkes (UNI: University of Northern Iowa)H-Index: 1
#2Rebecca S. Barak (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 5
Last. Andrea T. KramerH-Index: 13
view all 3 authors...
A fundamental aspect of establishing native plant species in restorations is ensuring that the seed used is viable. We test whether seed viability estimates for wild-collected seed of 4 forb species native to prairie habitat differ when using 3 methods: 1) germination, 2) tetrazolium, and 3) X-ray. Study species include Eryngium yuccifolium Michx. (button eryngo [Apiaceae]), Lespedeza capitata Michx. (roundhead lespedeza [Fabaceae]), Liatris aspera Michx. (rough prairie blazing star [Asteraceae]...
2 CitationsSource
#1Rebecca S. Barak (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 5
#2Jeremie B. FantH-Index: 14
Last. Krissa A. SkogenH-Index: 6
view all 4 authors...
Abstract. Native plants that are able to persist and reproduce in highly disturbed habitats (i.e., “native winners”) may be useful to include in seed mixes when restoring similarly disturbed habitat. Establishing whether these plants produce viable seeds that germinate to a high degree under appropriate conditions is a first step to determining their utility as restoration species. We identified 10 potential native winners at sites degraded by cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), an invasive annual gra...
8 CitationsSource
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