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Allan B. Wolfson
University of Pittsburgh
Intensive care medicineEmergency medicineEmergency departmentMedical emergencyMedicine
66Publications
22H-index
1,498Citations
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Publications 67
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#1John Z Hillenkamp (University of Pittsburgh)
#2Allan B. Wolfson (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 22
#1Brian M. Killeen (University of Pittsburgh)
#2Allan B. Wolfson (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 22
: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), currently the fourth leading cause of death worldwide, is characterized by respiratory symptoms and airflow limitation often caused by long-term exposure to noxious particles or gases, most commonly tobacco. Symptoms include dyspnea, cough, and sputum production, and episodes of acute worsening are termed exacerbations. The most common cause of exacerbations is infection, and treatments may include antibiotics, bronchodilators, and systemic cortico...
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#1Brian M. Killeen (University of Pittsburgh)
#2Allan B. Wolfson (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 22
Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE) has traditionally been treated pharmacologically, with a combination of nitrates, diuretics, morphine, and inotropes. Since the introduction of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV), a method of providing mechanical ventilation that does not bypass the upper airway, this modality has been widely used as an important addition to the acute care of ACPE.
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Acute pain is one of the most common complaints in the emergency department. With recent efforts to find effective non-opioid analgesics, ketamine has surfaced as a potential option for ED analgesia.(1-3) While ketamine is typically used as a sedative agent, several studies have shown that when it is administered in sub-dissociative doses, both as a stand-alone agent and as an adjunct to opioids, it may also provide analgesia.(4) Two recently published meta-analyses compared ketamine with opioid...
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#1Andrew C. Meltzer (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 11
#2Pamela K. Burrows (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 12
Last. Stephen V. Jackman (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 10
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Abstract Objective To study patients who initially presented to the Emergency Department with acute renal colic to determine if patient-reported stone passage detects stone expulsion as accurately as follow-up computed tomography (CT) scan. Methods This is a secondary analysis of a multi-center prospective trial of patients diagnosed by a CT scan with a symptomatic ureteral stone Results 403 patients were randomized in the original study and 21 were excluded from this analysis because they were ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Justin Putnam (University of Pittsburgh)
#2Allan B. Wolfson (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 22
: Stress ulceration is a term coined to explain a form of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding seen in critically ill patients, who are commonly defined as individuals admitted to an intensive care unit. Stress ulceration was first noted in the 1960s when a series of post-mortem examinations performed on critically ill individuals revealed gastric mucosal lesions.
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#1Daniel S. Kowalsky (University of Pittsburgh)
#2Allan B. Wolfson (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 22
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#1Daniel S. Kowalsky (University of Pittsburgh)
#2Allan B. Wolfson (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 22
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#1Daniel S. Kowalsky (University of Pittsburgh)
#2Allan B. Wolfson (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 22
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#1Jason S. Ferderber (University of Pittsburgh)
#2Allan B. Wolfson (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 22
Abstract Background Although “spear tackling” is known to be a risk factor for cervical spine injury due to axial loading of the neck, and although this technique was officially banned from American football in 1976, football-associated cervical spine injuries continue to be reported. This case highlights the importance of recognizing high-risk mechanisms for cervical spine injury, and specifically the danger of spear tackling among football players at all levels. Case Report A 16-year-old male ...
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