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Hilary E. Erenler
University of Northampton
7Publications
2H-index
152Citations
Publications 7
Newest
#1Michael P. Gillman (University of Lincoln)H-Index: 13
#2Hilary E. Erenler (University of Northampton)H-Index: 2
Last.Phil J. Sutton (University of Lincoln)H-Index: 2
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High density regions within the spiral arms are expected to have profound effects on passing stars. Understanding of the potential effects on the Earth and our Solar System is dependent on a sufficient dynamic model of arm passage. Using a novel combination of data we derive a model of the timings of the Solar System through the spiral arms and the relationship to arm tracers such as methanol masers. This reveals that asteroid/comet impacts are significantly clustered near the spiral arms and wi...
1 CitationsSource
#1Michael P. Gillman (University of Lincoln)H-Index: 13
#2Hilary E. Erenler (University of Northampton)H-Index: 2
Abstract The passage of our Solar System through the spiral arms has been implicated as a contributor to global environmental perturbations. The suggestion of a consistent structure within the arms, informed by density wave theory, raises the possibility of repeating patterns of events at each arm crossing. Here we test the hypothesis that the structure of the arms of our galaxy influences the stratigraphic record on Earth. We construct independent structural and temporal models and combine thes...
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#1Hilary E. Erenler (University of Northampton)H-Index: 2
#2Michael C. Orr (USU: Utah State University)H-Index: 3
Last.Jean-Michel MaesH-Index: 1
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Ground-nesting bees use a variety of substrates in which to establish cells and complete their reproductive cycles. Here we document the highly aberrant occurrence of a solitary bee species, Anthophora squammulosa Dours, 1870 (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Anthophorini), nesting within meters of an active volcanic crater in Nicaragua, Central America. The nest location is exposed to continuous, strongly acidic gas emissions (>2.7 ppm of SO2), and sporadic vent clearing episodes that blanket the surroundi...
2 CitationsSource
#1Jeff Ollerton (University of Northampton)H-Index: 34
#2Hilary E. Erenler (University of Northampton)H-Index: 2
Last.Robin G M Crockett (University of Northampton)H-Index: 15
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Pollinators are fundamental to maintaining both biodiversity and agricultural productivity, but habitat destruction, loss of flower resources, and increased use of pesticides are causing declines in their abundance and diversity. Using historical records, we assessed the rate of extinction of bee and flower-visiting wasp species in Britain from the mid-19th century to the present. The most rapid phase of extinction appears to be related to changes in agricultural policy and practice beginning in...
135 CitationsSource
#1Hilary E. Erenler (University of Northampton)H-Index: 2
#2Paul A. Ashton (Edge Hill University)H-Index: 10
Last.Jeff Ollerton (University of Northampton)H-Index: 34
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The demise of coppicing in UK ancient woodlands, combined with the planting of non-native, fast-growing conifers in the twentieth century, heightens the potential recharge value of ground flora seed banks. Soil cores from adjoining semi-natural and conifer-containing stands in four lowland ancient woods in central England were removed to establish seed bank species richness. During a fourteen-month germination trial soil from two depths yielded 6554 seedlings from 81 species, ten of which showed...
11 CitationsSource
#1Hilary E. Erenler (University of Northampton)H-Index: 2
#2Michael P. Gillman (OU: Open University)H-Index: 13
Micropterix calthella L. (Micropterigidae) is a small, day-flying moth from the basal-most extant lineage of the Lepidoptera. The species name reflects its conspicuous presence on Caltha palustris L. (Ranunculaceae). However, adults also favour sedges (Carex spp., Cyperaceae), on which they gather gregariously to feed on pollen and find mates. In a UK ancient wood, the phenology of eight sedge species together with individual moth and mating pair densities were monitored from 15th April to 8th J...
2 CitationsSource
#1Michael P. Gillman (OU: Open University)H-Index: 13
#2Hilary E. Erenler (University of Northampton)H-Index: 2
Cassava has been cultivated in Central and South America for about 8000 years. Following export to Africa and Asia in the 16th–19th centuries it is now established as a vital component of the diet of many of the world's poorest people. Growth and processing of the plant in Central and South America represents one of the few remaining expressions of indigenous knowledge. This article highlights the importance of traditional methods of cultivation and processing in contributing to a large number o...
1 CitationsSource
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