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Hilary E. Erenler
University of Northampton
10Publications
3H-index
143Citations
Publications 10
Newest
Published on Jun 25, 2018in International Journal of Astrobiology 1.92
Michael P. Gillman1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Lincoln),
Hilary E. Erenler3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Northampton),
Phil J Sutton1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Lincoln)
High density regions within the spiral arms are expected to have profound effects on passing stars. Understanding of the potential effects on the Earth and our Solar System is dependent on a sufficient dynamic model of arm passage. Using a novel combination of data we derive a model of the timings of the Solar System through the spiral arms and the relationship to arm tracers such as methanol masers. This reveals that asteroid/comet impacts are significantly clustered near the spiral arms and wi...
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Published on Apr 1, 2016in Pan-pacific Entomologist 0.53
Hilary E. Erenler3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Northampton),
Michael C. Orr3
Estimated H-index: 3
(USU: Utah State University)
+ 3 AuthorsJean-Michel Maes1
Estimated H-index: 1
Ground-nesting bees use a variety of substrates in which to establish cells and complete their reproductive cycles. Here we document the highly aberrant occurrence of a solitary bee species, Anthophora squammulosa Dours, 1870 (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Anthophorini), nesting within meters of an active volcanic crater in Nicaragua, Central America. The nest location is exposed to continuous, strongly acidic gas emissions (>2.7 ppm of SO2), and sporadic vent clearing episodes that blanket the surroundi...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 12, 2014in Science 41.06
Jeff Ollerton34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of Northampton),
Hilary E. Erenler3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Northampton)
+ 1 AuthorsRobin G M Crockett14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Northampton)
It is increasingly recognized that many pollinator populations are declining. Ollerton et al. looked at British historical distribution records for bees and flower-visiting wasps across the past century. Though it is well known that agricultural intensification after World War II had a negative impact on many species, pollinator declines began in the decades preceding this time, when other changes were made to agricultural practices and policies. Science , this issue p. [1360][1] [1]: /lookup/vo...
114 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2010in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
Hilary E. Erenler3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Northampton),
Paul Ashton10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Edge Hill University)
+ 1 AuthorsJeff Ollerton34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of Northampton)
The demise of coppicing in UK ancient woodlands, combined with the planting of non-native, fast-growing conifers in the twentieth century, heightens the potential recharge value of ground flora seed banks. Soil cores from adjoining semi-natural and conifer-containing stands in four lowland ancient woods in central England were removed to establish seed bank species richness. During a fourteen-month germination trial soil from two depths yielded 6554 seedlings from 81 species, ten of which showed...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2010in Arthropod-plant Interactions
Hilary E. Erenler3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Northampton),
Michael P. Gillman12
Estimated H-index: 12
(OU: Open University)
Micropterix calthella L. (Micropterigidae) is a small, day-flying moth from the basal-most extant lineage of the Lepidoptera. The species name reflects its conspicuous presence on Caltha palustris L. (Ranunculaceae). However, adults also favour sedges (Carex spp., Cyperaceae), on which they gather gregariously to feed on pollen and find mates. In a UK ancient wood, the phenology of eight sedge species together with individual moth and mating pair densities were monitored from 15th April to 8th J...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2009in Environmental Sciences
Michael P. Gillman12
Estimated H-index: 12
(OU: Open University),
Hilary E. Erenler3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Northampton)
Cassava has been cultivated in Central and South America for about 8000 years. Following export to Africa and Asia in the 16th–19th centuries it is now established as a vital component of the diet of many of the world's poorest people. Growth and processing of the plant in Central and South America represents one of the few remaining expressions of indigenous knowledge. This article highlights the importance of traditional methods of cultivation and processing in contributing to a large number o...
1 Citations Source Cite
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