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Milica Nikolić
University of Amsterdam
12Publications
5H-index
93Citations
Publications 12
Newest
#1Milica Nikolić (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 5
#2Lisa van der Storm (EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)H-Index: 1
Last.Susan M. Bögels (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 53
view all 6 authors...
textabstractWhy are some children more socially anxious than others? One theory holds that socially anxious children are poor mindreaders, which hampers their social interactions; another that socially anxious children are advanced mindreaders leading to heightened self-consciousness in social situations. To test these theories simultaneously, this study (N = 105, ages 8–12) assessed children’s mindreading (accuracy in detecting mental states from the eye region), self-consciousness (indexed as ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Moniek A. J. Zeegers (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 3
#2Wieke de Vente (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 13
Last.Cristina Colonnesi (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 12
view all 6 authors...
The main aim of this study was to test whether mothers’ (n = 116) and fathers’ (n = 116) mind‐mindedness predicts infants’ physiological emotion regulation (heart rate variability; HRV) across the first year of life. Three hypotheses were examined: (a) parents’ mind‐mindedness at 4 and 12 months predicts infants’ HRV at 12 months over and above infants’ initial HRV levels at 4 months, (b) mothers’ and fathers’ mind‐mindedness independently predict infant HRV, and (c) the effects of mind‐mindedne...
3 CitationsSource
#1Eddie BrummelmanH-Index: 11
#2Milica NikolićH-Index: 5
Last.Susan M. BögelsH-Index: 53
view all 3 authors...
Physiological responses can reveal emotional states that individuals are unwilling to admit to others. Here, we studied what blushing reveals about the emotional states of narcissistic children. Narcissistic children (i.e., those high on the personality trait of narcissism) have a pervasive sense of grandiosity. We theorized that narcissistic children are so invested in their sense of grandiosity that even modest praise can make them feel depreciated. Because narcissistic children may not admit ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Milica Nikolić (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 5
#2Eddie Brummelman (Stanford University)H-Index: 11
Last.Susan M. Bögels (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 53
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Blushing is an involuntary reddening of the face that typically occurs when people are concerned about making negative impressions on others. Although people typically blush for their mishaps or misdeeds, Darwin observed that some people, and especially children, also blush when they are lavished with praise. We theorize that socially anxious children blush when praised in inflated ways because they believe they do not match the inflated image others hold of them. Such praise-induced bl...
2 CitationsSource
#1Milica Nikolić (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 5
#2Evin Aktar (LEI: Leiden University)H-Index: 7
Last.Wieke de Vente (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 13
view all 5 authors...
Background Physiological hyperarousal in social situations is a characteristic of individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD), but so far it has been rarely studied as a biological risk for SAD. Here, we investigate whether children at high risk for SAD (because of their parents’ SAD) display physiological hyperarousal while interacting with a stranger. Also, we examine whether early physiological hyperarousal is related to later child social anxiety. Method One hundred and seventeen children...
4 CitationsSource
#1Cristina Colonnesi (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 12
#2Milica Nikolić (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 5
Last.Susan M. Bögels (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 53
view all 4 authors...
Children’s early onset of social anxiety may be associated with their social understanding, and their ability to express emotions adaptively. We examined whether social anxiety in 48-month-old children (N = 110; 54 boys) was related to: a) a lower level of theory of mind (ToM); b) a lower proclivity to express shyness in a positive way (adaptive); and c) a higher tendency to express shyness in a negative way (non-adaptive). In addition, we investigated to what extent children’s level of social a...
9 CitationsSource
Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) runs in families. Building on recent theoretical approaches, this review focuses on potential environmental pathways for parent-to-child transmission of GAD. First, we address child acquisition of a generalized pattern of fearful/anxious and avoidant responding to potential threat from parents via verbal information and via modeling. Next, we address how parenting behaviors may contribute to maintenance of fearful/anxious and avoidant reactions in children. Fin...
7 Citations
#1Milica NikolićH-Index: 5
Being concerned about what other people think of us is socially adaptive because it helps us behave in ways that promote bonding with others. However, in the Western world, one in every 10 individuals experiences extreme concerns about being negatively evaluated by others, which impair their daily functioning. These individuals suffer from Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD). What makes people develop SAD? Current theories propose broad genetic and environmental factors, such as temperament and parent...
#1Milica Nikolić (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 5
#2Wieke de Vente (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 13
Last.Susan M. Bögels (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 53
view all 4 authors...
Objective Autonomic hyperarousal in social situations is considered a genetic vulnerability factor for social anxiety disorder (SAD), but so far it is unstudied in children at risk for developing SAD. We examined autonomic activity during socially stressful tasks in children of mothers and fathers with and without lifetime SAD to reveal possible biological mechanisms of intergenerational transmission of SAD. Methods One hundred ten children aged 4.5 years were asked to sing a song in front of an...
12 CitationsSource
#1Eline L. Möller (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 8
#2Milica Nikolić (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 5
Last.Susan M. Bögels (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 53
view all 4 authors...
Abstract In this meta-analysis we investigated differential associations between maternal and paternal parenting behaviors (overcontrol, overprotection, overinvolvement, autonomy granting, challenging parenting) and anxiety and its precursors (fearful temperament, behavioral inhibition, shyness) in children (0–5 years). Two meta-analyses were conducted, one for mothers ( k = 28, N = 5,728), and one for fathers ( k = 12, N = 1,019). In general, associations between parenting and child anxiety wer...
40 CitationsSource
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