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Susan S. Silbey
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
88Publications
25H-index
3,089Citations
Publications 88
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#1Susan S. Silbey (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 25
Susan Silbey began her academic training in political science and in the course of her studies became a sociologist of law, the last two decades as a member of the Massachusetts Institute of Techno...
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#1Ruthanne Huising (EMLYON Business School)H-Index: 1
#2Susan S. Silbey (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 25
The range of organizational responses to regulatory requirements is often explained by describing the organization as a monolithic actor interacting with external agents. We look inside regulated o...
1 CitationsSource
#1Carroll Seron (UCI: University of California, Irvine)H-Index: 13
#2Susan S. Silbey (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 25
Last.Brian Rubineau (McGill University)H-Index: 9
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Engineering is often described as an enduring bastion of masculine culture where women experience marginality. Using diaries from undergraduate engineering students at four universities, the authors explore women’s interpretations of their status within the profession. The authors’ findings show that women recognize their marginality, providing clear and strong criticisms of their experiences. But these criticisms remain isolated and muted; they coalesce neither into broader organizational or in...
10 CitationsSource
#1Susan S. SilbeyH-Index: 25
Les principes d’une demarche de recherche relevant de la tradition « Law and Society » sont de recourir a des methodes scientifiques rigoureuses appliquees a une demarche empirique susceptible d’etre soumise a evaluation par des pairs et a une critique, ceci en vue de comprendre comment le droit agit comme une institution : soit un ensemble de processus reguliers et identifiables, inspires par des aspirations culturelles et susceptibles d’inscrire la contrainte par la regle dans des schemes de d...
1 Citations
#1Patricia EwickH-Index: 6
#2Susan S. SilbeyH-Index: 25
10 CitationsSource
#2Terence C. Halliday (American Bar Foundation)H-Index: 9
Last.Susan S. Silbey (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 25
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This contribution presents a series of statements on the future of publishing by the Law & Society Review and the Law & Society Association generally. Framed by the first author's introductory and concluding comments are contributions by Halliday, Liu, Morrill, Seron, and Silbey. This debate, based on a LSR 50th anniversary panel held at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the LSA, is intended to open up a broader conversation among members of the Association. Positions by individual contributors can onl...
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Last.Susan S. SilbeyH-Index: 25
view all 6 authors...
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#2Sida LiuH-Index: 10
Last.Susan S. SilbeyH-Index: 25
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Introduction to Reflections by Morrill, Liu, Silbey, Halliday, and SeronBy Joachim J. Savelsberg, Co-Editor, University of MinnesotaThe year 2016 witnesses the 50th anniversary of the Law & Society Review, and the occasion warrants celebration. Introducing Volume 50, Timothy Johnson, my co-editor of the past 3 years, and I used our editorial comments to spell out some of the reasons (Johnson and Savelsberg 2016). They include the massive increase in submissions in recent decades and years to alm...
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#1Carroll Seron (UCI: University of California, Irvine)H-Index: 13
#2Susan S. Silbey (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 25
Last.Brian Rubineau (McGill University)H-Index: 9
view all 4 authors...
Why does sex segregation in professional occupations persist? Arguing that the cultures and practices of professional socialization serve to perpetuate this segregation, the authors examine the case of engineering. Using interview and diary entry data following students from college entry to graduation, the authors show how socialization leads women to develop less confidence that they will “fit” into the culture of engineering. The authors identify three processes that produce these cultural mi...
39 CitationsSource
The lower courts are a paradox. The limited jurisdiction courts are de scribed as invisible, neglected by the bar, scholars and the citizenry, and at the same time as the only judicial experience for most who enter the court system. It is repeatedly suggested that they be done away with, but at the same time it is suggested that they perform vital functions at the juncture of several official hierarchies and systems. They are applauded for being flexi ble and informal, and chided for failing to ...
14 Citations
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