Match!
Mika Kivimaeki
Physical therapyProspective cohort studyCohort studyPopulationMedicine
1,643Publications
130H-index
82.3kCitations
What is this?
Publications 1623
Newest
#1Dusan PetrovicH-Index: 5
#2José Haba-Rubio (UNIL: University of Lausanne)H-Index: 22
Last. Rosario TuminoH-Index: 102
view all 21 authors...
AIMS: Sleep disturbances exhibit a strong social patterning, and inadequate sleep has been associated with adverse health outcomes, including cardiovascular disorders (CVD). However, the contribution of sleep to socioeconomic inequalities in CVD is unclear. This study pools data from eight European cohorts to investigate the role of sleep duration in the association between life-course socioeconomic status (SES) and CVD. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used cross-sectional data from eight European cohor...
1 CitationsSource
#1Carmen de Keijzer (UPF: Pompeu Fabra University)H-Index: 5
#2Maria Foraster (UPF: Pompeu Fabra University)H-Index: 14
Last. Josep M. Antó (UPF: Pompeu Fabra University)H-Index: 85
view all 13 authors...
BACKGROUND Arterial stiffness, and its progression with age, is an important indicator of cardiovascular aging. Greenspace exposure may protect against arterial stiffness by promoting physical activity, fostering social cohesion, and reducing stress and exposure to air pollution and noise. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to investigate the association of long-term exposure to outdoor greenspace with arterial stiffness and its progression over time. METHODS This prospective cohort study was ...
Source
#1Mifuyu Akasaki (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 1
#2Mika Kivimaeki (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 130
Last. Martin J. Shipley (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 104
view all 5 authors...
Background Attrition, the loss of participants as a study progresses, is a considerable challenge in longitudinal studies. This study examined whether two forms of attrition, ‘withdrawal’ (formal discontinued participation) and ‘non-response’ (non-response among participants continuing in the study), have different associations with mortality and whether these associations differed across time in a multi-wave longitudinal study. Methods Participants were 10 012 civil servants who participated at...
Source
#1Kati Karhula (Finnish Institute of Occupational Health)H-Index: 8
#2Jarno Turunen (Finnish Institute of Occupational Health)
Last. Mikko Härmä (Finnish Institute of Occupational Health)H-Index: 43
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Background Studies in the health care sector indicate that good work time control is associated with better perceived wellbeing but also with non-ergonomic work schedules, such as compressed work schedules. Participatory working time scheduling is a collaborative approach to scheduling shift work. Currently, there is a lack of information on whether working hour characteristics and employees’ wellbeing in irregular shift work change after implementing participatory working time scheduli...
Source
#1George David Batty (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 30
#2Ian J. Deary (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 132
Last. CR Gale (University of Southampton)H-Index: 7
view all 6 authors...
Background While certain infectious diseases have been linked to socioeconomic disadvantage, mental health problems, and lower cognitive function, relationships with COVID-19 are either uncertain or untested Our objective was to examine the association of a range of psychosocial factors with hospitalisation for COVID-19 Methods UK Biobank, a prospective cohort study, comprises around half a million people who were aged 40 to 69 years at study induction between 2006 and 2010 when information on p...
Source
#1M AnaturkH-Index: 3
#2Tobias KaufmannH-Index: 26
Last. Lars T. WestlyeH-Index: 56
view all 12 authors...
#1M AnaturkH-Index: 3
#2Sana SuriH-Index: 8
Last. Claire E. SextonH-Index: 21
view all 10 authors...
#1Marianna Virtanen (Stockholm University)H-Index: 63
#2Markus Jokela (UH: University of Helsinki)H-Index: 56
Last. Mika Kivimaeki (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 130
view all 30 authors...
To examine the relation between long working hours and change in body mass index (BMI). We performed random effects meta-analyses using individual-participant data from 19 cohort studies from Europe, US and Australia (n = 122,078), with a mean of 4.4-year follow-up. Working hours were measured at baseline and categorised as part time (<35 h/week), standard weekly hours (35–40 h, reference), 41–48 h, 49–54 h and ≥55 h/week (long working hours). There were four outcomes at follow-up: (1) overweigh...
Source
#1Markus Jokela (UH: University of Helsinki)H-Index: 56
#2Jaakko Airaksinen (UH: University of Helsinki)H-Index: 1
Last. Christian Hakulinen (UH: University of Helsinki)H-Index: 17
view all 6 authors...
OBJECTIVE: We examined how personality traits of the Five Factor Model were related to years of healthy life years lost (mortality and disability) for individuals and the population. METHOD: Participants were 131,195 individuals from 10 cohort studies from Australia, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States (n = 43,935 from seven cohort studies for the longitudinal analysis of disability, assessed using scales of Activities of Daily Living). RESULTS: Lower Conscientiousness was associa...
1 CitationsSource
#1George David Batty (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 30
#2Ian J. Deary (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 132
Last. Catharine R. Gale (University of Southampton)H-Index: 64
view all 6 authors...
Objective: To examine the association of a range of psychosocial factors with hospitalisation for COVID-19. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: England. Participants: UK Biobank comprises around half a million people who were aged 40 to 69 years at study induction between 2006 and 2010 when information on psychosocial factors and covariates were captured. Main outcome measure: Hospitalisation for COVID-19 in England between 16th March and 26th April 2020 as provided by Public Health Engla...
Source
12345678910