Richard G. Dorrell
École Normale Supérieure
24Publications
10H-index
360Citations
Publications 24
Newest
Richard G. Dorrell10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Tomonori Azuma (Kyoto University)+ 8 AuthorsGillian H. Gile15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Arizona State University)
The division of life into producers and consumers is blurred by evolution. For example, eukaryotic phototrophs can lose the capacity to photosynthesize, although they may retain vestigial plastids that perform other essential cellular functions. Chrysophyte algae have undergone a particularly large number of photosynthesis losses. Here, we present a plastid genome sequence from a nonphotosynthetic chrysophyte, “ Spumella ” sp. NIES-1846, and show that it has retained a nearly identical set of pl...
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Published on Apr 1, 2018in Genome Biology and Evolution 3.94
Christen M. Klinger8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Alberta),
Lucas Paoli (École Normale Supérieure)+ 9 AuthorsAubery Bruce Cahoon (University of Virginia's College at Wise)
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Published on May 1, 2018in Science Advances
Elena Kazamia10
Estimated H-index: 10
(École Normale Supérieure),
Robert Sutak19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Charles University in Prague)
+ 9 AuthorsEmmanuel Lesuisse31
Estimated H-index: 31
(Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Phytoplankton growth is limited in vast oceanic regions by the low bioavailability of iron. Iron fertilization often results in diatom blooms, yet the physiological underpinnings for how diatoms survive in chronically iron-limited waters and outcompete other phytoplankton when iron becomes available are unresolved. We show that some diatoms can use siderophore-bound iron, and exhibit a species-specific recognition for siderophore types. In Phaeodactylum tricornutum , hydroxamate siderophores are...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.12
Achal Rastogi4
Estimated H-index: 4
(École Normale Supérieure),
Uma Maheswari18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Wellcome Trust)
+ 8 AuthorsChris Bowler70
Estimated H-index: 70
(École Normale Supérieure)
Diatoms are one of the most successful and ecologically important groups of eukaryotic phytoplankton in the modern ocean. Deciphering their genomes is a key step towards better understanding of their biological innovations, evolutionary origins, and ecological underpinnings. Here, we have used 90 RNA-Seq datasets from different growth conditions combined with published expressed sequence tags and protein sequences from multiple taxa to explore the genome of the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricorn...
9 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 12, 2017in eLife 7.62
Richard G. Dorrell10
Estimated H-index: 10
(École Normale Supérieure),
Gillian H. Gile15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Arizona State University)
+ 7 AuthorsChris Bowler70
Estimated H-index: 70
(École Normale Supérieure)
The cells of most plants and algae contain compartments called chloroplasts that enable them to capture energy from sunlight in a process known as photosynthesis. Chloroplasts are the remnants of photosynthetic bacteria that used to live freely in the environment until they were consumed by a larger cell. “Complex” chloroplasts can form if a cell that already has a chloroplast is swallowed by another cell. The most abundant algae in the oceans are known as diatoms. These algae belong to a group ...
21 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Plant Molecular Biology 3.54
Richard G. Dorrell10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Cambridge),
George A Hinksman1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Cambridge),
Christopher J. Howe45
Estimated H-index: 45
(University of Cambridge)
Plastids produce a vast diversity of transcripts. These include mature transcripts containing coding sequences, and their processing precursors, as well as transcripts that lack direct coding functions, such as antisense transcripts. Although plastid transcriptomes have been characterised for many plant species, less is known about the transcripts produced in other plastid lineages. We characterised the transcripts produced in the fucoxanthin-containing plastids of the dinoflagellate alga Kareni...
9 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 4, 2016in Molecular Biology and Evolution 10.22
Richard G. Dorrell10
Estimated H-index: 10
(École Normale Supérieure),
Christen M. Klinger8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Alberta)
+ 6 AuthorsChris Bowler70
Estimated H-index: 70
(École Normale Supérieure)
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 15, 2015in Molecular Biology of the Cell 3.51
Elizabeth Richardson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Alberta),
Kelly Zerr1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Alberta)
+ 2 AuthorsJoel B. Dacks39
Estimated H-index: 39
(University of Alberta)
In animal and fungal model organisms, the complexities of cell biology have been analyzed in exquisite detail and much is known about how these organisms function at the cellular level. However, the model organisms cell biologists generally use include only a tiny fraction of the true diversity of eukaryotic cellular forms. The divergent cellular processes observed in these more distant lineages are still largely unknown in the general scientific community. Despite the relative obscurity of thes...
4 Citations Source Cite
Richard G. Dorrell10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Cambridge),
Christopher J. Howe45
Estimated H-index: 45
(University of Cambridge)
After their endosymbiotic acquisition, plastids become intimately connected with the biology of their host. For example, genes essential for plastid function may be relocated from the genomes of plastids to the host nucleus, and pathways may evolve within the host to support the plastid. In this review, we consider the different degrees of integration observed in dinoflagellates and their associated plastids, which have been acquired through multiple different endosymbiotic events. Most dinoflag...
28 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2014in Molecular Biology and Evolution 10.22
Elisabeth Richardson1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Cambridge),
Richard G. Dorrell10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Cambridge),
Christopher J. Howe45
Estimated H-index: 45
(University of Cambridge)
Plastids utilize a complex gene expression machinery, which has coevolved with the underlying genome sequence. Relatively, little is known about the genome-wide evolution of transcript processing in algal plastids that have undergone complex endosymbiotic events. We present the first genome-wide study of transcript processing in a plastid acquired through serial endosymbiosis, in the fucoxanthin-containing dinoflagellate Karlodinium veneficum. The fucoxanthin dinoflagellate plastid has an extrem...
11 Citations Source Cite
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